Sowing nemesis seeds from seed is very easy. You just need to take some soil and mix it with water and let it soak overnight. Then you can plant your seeds at any time during the day or night. The best time to sow nemesis seeds is in early spring when there are still plenty of sun rays available for germination.

The most common time to sow nemesis seeds is in late summer or autumn. However, if you want to grow them earlier than that then you have several options:

You can start them indoors immediately after sowing outdoors. They will not germinate until they get exposed to sunlight.

If you live in a cold climate where the days are long and the nights short, then sowing outside may be too early for your needs. You can try to sow them indoors when the days are longer and the nights shorter. If you wait till evening, then your nemesis seeds will germinate later in the night.

When you’re ready to harvest your plants, then you’ll need to wait until morning before harvesting them so that they don’t rot while waiting for sunlight.

How To Collect Nemesia Seeds?

Nemesis seeds are usually collected from a garden center or nursery store. If you grow nemesis plants in your garden, then collecting nemesis seeds is easy. Let your plant flower, then let the flower die off before collecting its seeds. You can dry the seeds in a cool, dry place for sowing at a later time. You can collect the nemesis seeds immediately after they are shed from the dead flower or you can leave them on the plant for up to a week before collecting them. There are pros and cons to both methods. If you leave the nemesis seeds on the plant for too long, then they will begin to rot and become useless. If you collect them too early, then they may not have fully matured yet and won’t grow into full nemesia plants.

How To Know If Nemesia Seeds Are Germinating?

Nemesis seeds need darkness in order to germinate. If you place your nemesis seeds in direct sunlight, then they will not sprout. You can test to see if they are ready to be planted by placing them in a container and covering it with a piece of cardboard. Poke some small holes in the cardboard so that the seeds receive some air. After a day or two, check the container to see if any of the nemesis seeds have sprouted. Those that have sprouted are ready for planting outside in pots or directly in your garden.

How Long Does It Take For A Nemesia Seed To Germinate?

Nemesia seeds can take up to a month to sprout if you let them sit on the plant until they die naturally. If you want to grow them right away, then you need to soak them overnight before planting them in soil or another suitable growing media. There are several ways to water nemesis seeds before planting:

You can place the nemesis seeds in a container of water during the day and then plant them in soil at night. This process can take a few days or a week to complete, but will give you nemesia plants right away.

You can place the nemesis seeds in a container of water and leave them in that container until they sprout. Then plant them directly in the soil. This method takes more time than the first one, but it is likely to yield faster results.

Nemesis plants can also be grown from cuttings, slips or division. These methods are used to grow nemesis plants when you can’t find the seeds for the plant or when you have too many plants for the amount of soil available.

Sources & references used in this article:

The inheritance of pseudo-self-compatibility (PSC) in Nemesia strumosa Benth by RJ Henny, PD Ascher – Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 1976 – Springer

Pollination systems, hybridization barriers and meiotic chromosome behaviour in Nemesia hybrids by PM Datson, BG Murray, KRW Hammett – Euphytica, 2006 – Springer

Discriminating styles (DS) and pollen-mediated pseudo-self-compatibility (PMPSC) in Nemesia strumosa benth. by CD Robacker, PD Ascher – Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 1982 – Springer

Effect of selection for pseudo-self compatibility in advanced inbred generations of Nemesia strumosa Benth. by CD Robacker, PD Ascher – Euphytica, 1982 – Springer

Discriminating styles (DS) and pollen-mediated pseudo-self-compatibility (PMPSC) in Nemesia strumosa Benth. by CD Robacker, PD Ascher – Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 1981 – Springer

Restoration of pseudo-self-compatibility (PSC) in derivatives of a high-PSC × no-PSC cross in Nemesia strumosa Benth by CD Robacker, PD Ascher – Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 1978 – Springer

Sporophytic recognition of pollen S alleles in the gametophytic self-incompatibility system of Nemesia strumosa benth by RJ Henny, PD Ascher – Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 1977 – Springer

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