Purple Aster Flower Types:

There are two kinds of purple flowers in nature. They are:

1) Dendrobium (or “diamond”) – These are the most common type of purple flower.

They have a diamond shape with a single petal that is colored purple. There are many varieties and they range from pale pink to deep red.

Some dendrobiums look like tiny stars or even diamonds themselves!

2) Spirostigma (or “star”) – These are the rarer kind of purple flower.

They have multiple petals that are colored violet, blue, green, brown or yellow. They usually grow on trees and shrubs rather than plants.

There are only four species of spirostigmas in nature; they include:

• Nothofagus (also known as “blue star” or “sea star” because it resembles a sea creature)

• Eriogonum (also known as “rainbow star” or “firefly star” because it looks like a rainbow)

• Phyllostachys (also known as “golden sunflower” or “sunflower” because its color resembles gold)

The name of the genus is named after the Greek word for ‘purple’. Most of them have golden anthers and purple filaments.

They are found in the Rocky Mountains and the Andes Mountains. There are over 100 species in this genus.

About Common Purple Asters

Common Purple Asters – Learn About Types Of Purple Aster Flowers | igrowplants.net

Common purple asters can be found anywhere in North America. The plant grows from one to three feet, with flowers that range from white to pale purple or pink.

They are also known as “bunch flower” because it grows in thick bunches.

Tall purple asters usually grow in clearings or fields. It is easy to spot because it looks very pretty from afar.

The leaves of the common purple asters are deeply divided into three lobes. The upper sides of the leaves are shiny green while the undersides have a light coating of white hairs.

Purple asters are related to sunflowers and goldenasters, which are also found in North America. They grow in clumps rather than as individual plants.

Purple asters bloom from July to September. The flowers produce seeds from August to October.

The roots are invasive.

The roots of purple asters are edible and were eaten as a vegetable by Native Americans. They can be eaten either raw or cooked into porridge.

The leaves and flowers can be used to make herbal tea.

Other Types Of Purple Asters

One of the most popular types of purple asters is the “Lanceolata” purple aster, which is also known as “lance-leaved purple wood aster” or “lancet leaf purple wood aster”.

This plant grows from one to three feet and has flowers that range from white to purple. It is commonly found in the forests of North America.

Common Purple Asters – Learn About Types Of Purple Aster Flowers - igrowplants.net

Another type of purple aster is the “Cutler’s aster”, which is also known as “cut-leaved purple wood aster”.

It is found in forests, wooded slopes and along streams in North America. It is also found in the mountains of Europe.

The plant grows from one to three feet and has flowers that range from white to purple.

Purple wood asters have leaves that are narrow and lance-shaped. The undersides of the leaves are covered with white hairs.

They grow from one to three feet and most have flowers that range from yellow to purple.

Sources & references used in this article:

Using the British national collection of asters to compare the attractiveness of 228 varieties to flower-visiting insects by M Garbuzov, FLW Ratnieks – Environmental entomology, 2015 – academic.oup.com

Summer Wildflowers of the Northeast: A Natural History by ES Burgess – 1906 – Torrey botanical club

Impact of planting geometry on seed quality of china aster genotypes under mid hill conditions of Uttarakhand by WP Wright – 1911 – Doubleday Page

Calico Aster: Symphyotrichum lateriflorum by C Gracie – 2020 – books.google.com

Observations on reproduction and phenology in some perennial asters by V Pandey, N Pandey, VK Rao – Chemical Science Review and …, 2017 – academia.edu

Wildflowers of the Eastern United States: An Introduction to Common Species of Woods, Wetlands and Fields by R Flower – ktgillumbotanty.wordpress.com

actSheet by AG Jones – American Midland Naturalist, 1978 – JSTOR

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