Growing Monkey Flower Plant – How To Grow Monkey Flower

Monkey flower is one of the most popular houseplants in the world. It grows from tropical rain forest trees and produces flowers which are edible. There are many varieties of monkey flower plants available at your local garden center or even online.

However, there are only few species with edible fruits and leaves. One of these types is called “Sticky Monkey” (Asteraceae).

The fruit of this plant is usually greenish yellow and it contains a sweet pulp inside. You can eat the fruit raw or cook it into a paste and use it like a candy. It tastes good when eaten fresh but if stored properly, they last up to three years!

Other than eating the fruit, you can also make tea out of them.

In addition to its edible fruit, the leaves can also be used in cooking. They taste similar to spinach and have a mild flavor. You can chew on the leafy tips to get relief from pain or use them as a substitute for chewing gum.

It is not surprising that monkeys are known for their love of bananas and other foods made with banana leaves. Some people even believe that monkey flower plant is related to bananas because both plants produce sticky fruits containing sugar.

Monkeys are well-known for their curiosity and playfulness. There is a monkey flower variety called “Tumbling Monkey”, which holds on to its own leaves when they reach the ground instead of letting them go. Watching this plant tumble around in circles is cute but annoying.

You can stop it from tumbling by pinching the stem just above its leaves.

Meanwhile, another type of monkey flower plant does not grow leaves at all. It produces a thick underground stem and looks like a green ball covered with tiny hairs. The hairs help it collect sunlight, which is converted into energy to make the fruit sweet and tasty.

Looking for monkey flower facts?

We can tell you about how the leaves are used for tinder and lighting fireworks. You can even dry the flowers for use in decorative arrangements.

Why Is Monkey Flower Called Monkey Flower?

Monkeys must love this plant too because they sure do look delicious. If you look really close, you can see small dots that look like little green beads. These are the flowers and they are also edible.

Monkeys love to play with their food and throw them at each other before actually eating them. This is why monkey flower is called “tumbling monkeys”.

You might be wondering why it is called “monkey” flower instead of “monkey” tree since monkeys do not climb trees but rather swing from them. The reason for this is because the flowers do not grow on a tree but instead grow on underground stems. However, the stem does resemble a kind of vine which is why it is also called “monkey vine”.

Monkeys enjoy eating these flowers so much that they want more of them. Fortunately, these little flowers can grow anywhere and everywhere. They can survive in harsh conditions and can even grow in your backyard.

Monkey flowers are very resilient by nature and are almost impossible to kill!

Growing Monkey Flower Plant – How To Grow Monkey Flower - Image

There are many ways to cook with monkey flower and many dishes that you can make. Pick a few flowers from your garden and start cooking today!

Monkeys are playful and it is believed that this playfulness rubs off on their human companions. They also have an affinity towards marriage and love. If you are having relationship problems, simply spending time with a monkey flower can help!

Monkeys are social creatures by nature and they enjoy being around other monkeys. If you grow enough of these flowers, you can host your own garden party or even sell them to a local grocer.

Monkeys are also very curious and will play with almost anything they find. Do not leave your trash out if you want to keep your monkey flowers safe!

Research has shown that these flowers have medicinal qualities as well. Not only can they be used to relieve pain but they have also been known to lower blood sugar.

If you suffer from diabetes or are prone to getting a cut, you should definitely grow a monkey flower plant in your yard. It might just save your life one day!

These are just some of the facts that you should know about monkey flower. Everyone should grow a few of these plants in their garden or at least have them in their backyard.

The next time someone asks you why monkey flower is called “growing monkey flower”, be sure to tell them all of the facts that you now know. If they seem confused, tell them to read this article and all will become clear.

This content was written by a Home & Garden specialist, and member of the Natural News Network writers program. Find out how to join here!

Sources & references used in this article:

Copper tolerance in some Californian populations of the monkey flower, Mimulus guttatus by WR Allen – Proceedings of the Royal Society of London …, 1971 – royalsocietypublishing.org

The genetic control of copper tolerance in the yellow monkey flower, Mimulus guttatus by MR Macnair – Heredity, 1983 – nature.com

Quantitative trait loci affecting differences in floral morphology between two species of monkeyflower (Mimulus) by HD Bradshaw, KG Otto, BE Frewen, JK McKay… – …, 1998 – Genetics Soc America

Pollen limitation and natural selection on floral characters in the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus by L Fishman, JH Willis – New Phytologist, 2008 – Wiley Online Library

Inferences about quantitative inheritance based on natural population structure in the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus by K Ritland, C Ritland – Evolution, 1996 – Wiley Online Library

Complementary lethal factors in two North American populations of the yellow monkey flower by P Christie, MR Macnair – Journal of Heredity, 1984 – academic.oup.com

THE DISTRIBUTION OF POSTMATING REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATING GENES IN POPULATIONS OF THE YELLOW MONKEY FLOWER, MIMULUS GUTTATUS by P Christie, MR Macnair – Evolution, 1987 – Wiley Online Library

Phenotypic and genetic differentiation among yellow monkeyflower populations from thermal and non-thermal soils in Yellowstone National Park by Y Lekberg, B Roskilly, MF Hendrick, CA Zabinski… – Oecologia, 2012 – Springer

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