Holly Plant Fertilizer: How And When To Feed Holly Shrubs

How And When To Feed Holly Shrubs (Pots)

In the spring time, holly plants are usually not growing well. They have little leaves and they don’t produce many new shoots. So, it is very difficult to get them into bloom condition. But there are ways to make them grow better in the summertime.

The first thing to do is to give your holly plant some extra water. Watering them too much will cause them to die, so just enough water is good enough. You can use a watering can or hose from the garden hose and put it over the top of the pot where your holly plants are located. If you want, you could even fill up a spray bottle with water and pour it over the top of the pot where your holly plants are located.

You may need to repeat this step if the soil around your holly plants is dry. Another way to increase their growth is to provide them with some nitrogen rich fertilizer. Nitrogen helps plants grow faster and stronger. It’s also necessary for flowering, but it isn’t always available in the winter months.

That’s why you should give your holly plant some extra water during the summertime before giving them any fertilizer.

You may need to put the fertilizer around the base of your holly plants. You should also water your holly plant first before putting down any fertilizer, so that the nutrients don’t wash away. You can go to a nursery or garden center and ask them for a bag of Holly-tone fertilizer. This is a special fertilizer used for holly plants specifically.

As you can see, there are many things you can do to help your holly plants grow bigger and stronger. With a little extra T.L.C, your holly plant can look outstanding during the summertime when it’s in full bloom!

Holly Plant Fertilizer: How And When To Feed Holly Shrubs

How And When To Feed Holly Shrubs (Outdoors)

With a little hard work and some tender loving care, you can increase the growth rate of your holly bushes or shrubs.

First, you need to ask yourself an important question: what type of holly plants do I have?

If you have a broadleaf evergreen holly shrub, such as a common English holly (Ilex aquifolium), then it’s relatively easy to increase the growth rate. All you need to do is prune it back and remove any dead or diseased branches during the late winter months. This will encourage new growth.

For evergreen holly bushes, such as the American holly (Ilex opaca), you should also prune them back during the late winter months. However, you should be a little more careful, because they have sharp thorns and will definitely hurt when they poke your skin!

Holly Plant Fertilizer: How And When To Feed Holly Shrubs - Picture

Fall is also a good time to prune broadleaf evergreen holly bushes, such as the English holly. It’s best to wait until after there is no danger of frost or freezing temperatures. You should wait until the leaves have fallen off the holly shrub. Pruning requires a lot of eye-hand coordination, so it’s best not to do it in the middle of winter when you can’t see what you’re doing very well.

If you have an evergreen holly tree, such as the American holly or the common Christmas Holly (Ilex aquifolium ‘Berkley’), then you need to be very careful how you prune it. It’s best to leave these shrubs and trees alone, because they don’t tolerate pruning very well. In fact, you shouldn’t prune them at all! They grow wild and are happy that way.

Broadleaf evergreen holly bushes can be grown as hedges, but you need to keep in mind that they grow from root suckers. If you don’t want unwanted holly bushes and shrubs growing all over the place, then you need to be careful where you plant them in the first place! Also, you need to trim the root suckers and rein them in with some garden fencing to keep them in check.

If you have other types of holly bushes or trees, such as the Inkberry holly (Ilex glabra) or the American holly (Ilex opaca ‘Burfordii’), then you should ask your local nursery staff where you should prune them and when. Each type of holly shrub or tree is slightly different when it comes to pruning.

Assuming you have broadleaf evergreen holly shrub, such as the English holly, you should prune it in late winter. This will encourage new growth and keep your hedge fairly low and easy to maintain. If you don’t want a hedge, just prune it to the ground and it will grow into a large bushy plant.

You should also prune it right after flowering. Wipe your pruning shears with a 70 percent isopropyl alcohol solution before and after use to prevent the spread of holly encephalopathy, which is a fungal disease that affects the brain of infected holly plants. Also, if you have a broadleaf evergreen holly tree that flowers during the winter or early spring, such as the American holly, you should prune it right after it finishes flowering.

It’s best to wear protective gear when pruning broadleaf evergreen holly shrubs and trees. This includes long pants, long sleeved tops, safety goggles, and leather gloves. The thorns on these bushes are very sharp and can easily cut your skin. You should also be careful when you’re handling the cuttings, because they can get under your skin as well.

Cuttings from pruned holly bushes and trees can be taken and replanted with a little bit of root growth. It’s best to take them in late winter or early spring and plant them straight away.

Broadleaf evergreen hollies make good ornamental hedges, especially for shrub borders. You can trim them into neat squares, circles, or creative shapes to suit your tastes. They look good all year round and can also provide valuable winter shelter for birds.

Broadleaf evergreen hollies grow in USDA Hardiness Zones 6 to 10, which means they’re frost tolerant. However, they don’t tolerate any salt spray and need to be at least 50 feet away from the ocean. They need regular irrigation in dry weather and can’t stand water-logged soil.

Broadleaf evergreen hollies can grow up to 25 feet in height, but can also be kept smaller with hard pruning. The leaves are 2 to 4 inches long and 1 to 2 inches wide and have a glossy finish. They have a ginger aroma when crushed.

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The flowers are small and inconspicuous and grow in clusters. They bloom from spring to mid-summer. The fruits of most broadleaf evergreen hollies are red and around 1 inch in diameter. The fruits of the American holly are a little bit smaller and usually bright red.

Broadleaf evergreen hollies are hardy, fast growing, and have thorns. They also have medicinal uses and can be made into dyes.

Broadleaf evergreen hollies are a popular choice as hedges because of their glossy foliage, medicinal uses, and attractive fruit.

The ‘American’ holly (Ilex opaca) is a native of eastern North America. It is a large, rounded evergreen tree growing up to 30 feet tall and with a canopy spread of up to 20 feet. Clusters of small white flowers appear in late winter to early spring and are followed by berries that turn red in late summer/autumn. It is often used as a hedging plant and unlike most holly species can be trimmed into a formal hedge without damaging subsequent growth.

The “Holiday” hollies (Ilex cornuta) are a group of hybrids between the American Holly and other holly species from Asia and South America. They are used extensively in landscaping in many parts of the southern USA and are also widely sold in garden centres and supermarkets as evergreen hedging plants, especially at Christmas when their clusters of red berries make them a very popular choice. They grow to between 6 and 15 feet tall and wide.

Common names: Christmas holly, Eastern American holly, American holly

“Holiday” hollies (Ilex cornuta) are usually sold as evergreen hedging plants, especially for Christmas. The red berries make them a very popular choice.

Habitat: Native to the USA east of the Mississippi River and Canada. It grows in damp soils in a variety of locations such as swamps and river banks.

Some species of holly, such as the American holly, grow into tall, towering trees and are wide spread throughout eastern North America. They typically grow in areas with damp soil and can be found in lowlands and on the edges of swamps.

Description: It is a evergreen tree or large shrub with sharp thorns. The leaves are glossy green in colour and are 2 to 4 inches long and 1 to 2 inches wide. They have a spiny margins and pointed tips. Small white flowers appear in late winter to early spring.

These are followed by red berries that hang on the tree in large clusters and ripen from green to red over the summer. The berries are edible but very sour.

The American holly is a native of eastern North America and can grow into a large, spreading tree in the wild. It prefers damp soils and can be found growing along riverbanks and near swamps.

Common names: American holly, Eastern American holly

The bright red berries of the American holly are very popular with birds and make a very showy display.

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Description: The American holly is a large evergreen shrub or small tree that can grow up to 30 feet tall but is more typically between 6 and 20 feet. It has a dark blackish-blue colour and sharp spines that grow in pairs along the branches. The leaves are dark green in colour and glossy, elliptical and pointed.

Uses: The berries are mildly poisonous to humans but are a favourite food of birds so it is popular in ornamental gardens. The wood is very hard and heavy and can be polished and used to make small items such as turners, musket stocks, pipes, beads and other small turned objects. It is also very durable and resistant to decay so can also be used to make items such as tool handles, fence posts, chopsticks and other objects that are exposed to the elements. It can be easily split and resists splitting so it is used to make canoe paddles, rafters, rolling pins and other objects that require a strong, heavy and pliable wood.

The Iroquoian Indians used the sap as a tooth cleaner.

Holly leaves (left) are bright green and have sharp spines on the edges and tips. The leaves of the American holly can be shiny blue-green in colour.

Common names: European holly, English holly, Holm oak

European holly is a tall evergreen tree that grows in southern England and north to the channel islands but it is rare in the far north. It can be grown in shepherds purse or other similar plants to protect the roots in exposed areas.

The berries are bright red but fade quickly to tan and the leaves turn a bright yellow in the fall. The berries provide food for birds and can be used to make tea, medicines and dyes

Description: The plant is a large evergreen shrub or small tree growing up to 30 feet tall with a rounded crown. The leaves are shiny green in colour and are long, straight and prickly. The flowers are yellow and grow in a long hanging spike.

Uses: The berries are poisonous to humans but provide a nutritious meal for birds. They can be used to make dyes, medicines and tea. The wood is very hard, heavy and durable but not often used nowadays.

Requires free-draining soil and plenty of room to grow.

Very ornamental flowering trees or shrubs for gardens. The bright yellow flowers in spring are followed by clusters of red berries in the fall.

Can be grown in hedges but require clipping to keep them shaped.

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They tend to grow very tall and often need supporting.

The bark is green in colour and the leaves are a dark green with a serrated edge.

The bark is thin, smooth and light grey in colour.

The leaves are green in colour and covered with fine white hairs.

The flowers are fragrant and grow in long hanging clusters.

The flowers are small, numerous and grow in large, dangling clusters at the tips of the branches.

Native to South Africa, it is grown commercially in California, Algeria, Israel and Australia.

The fruit is small and fleshy with a single seed.

The leaves are large, serrated and glossy.

Common name: Hoop Pine

There are two sub-species or varieties, them being King Billy and Scribbly Gum. The timber of both is used for making furniture, flooring, roof shingles and boat hulls. It can be used to make quality barrels, ladders, posts, railings, shingles and tool handles. The resin has medicinal uses, especially as a skin insect repellent.

The seeds are a source of oil and the Aborigines ate the sap which they also used as glue.

Common name: Indian Madder, American Madder, American Weld

Both leaves and roots are a source of a red or pink dye which was used to colour wool. The flowers contain a purple pigment which was made into face paint by Native Americans. Leaves and roots were used in medicines to treat skin conditions, relax the uterus and stimulate labour.

Holly Plant Fertilizer: How And When To Feed Holly Shrubs - igrowplants.net

Common name: Indian Paint, American Lithargoge

Both leaves and roots are a source of a red or pink dye which was used to colour wool, the flowers contain a purple pigment which was made into face paint by Native Americans.

The leaves and roots were used in medicines to treat skin conditions, relax the uterus and stimulate labour.

Common name: Ironwood, Desert Ironwood

The dense wood is very hard and heavy. It has many ornamental uses including turned objects, furniture, knife handles, etc. It is also used in the making of drums. The dust from sanding this wood is toxic so care must be take to protect the lungs.

It takes a high polish and is sometimes used to make tobacco pipes.

Sources & references used in this article:

Feeding habits of the adult Japanese beetle by IM Hawley, FW Metzger – 1940 – books.google.com

Host Plant Use by the Invasive Halyomorpha halys (Stål) on Woody Ornamental Trees and Shrubs by EJ Bergmann, PD Venugopal, HM Martinson… – PloS one, 2016 – journals.plos.org

Associational resistance and associational susceptibility: having right or wrong neighbors by P Barbosa, J Hines, I Kaplan… – Annual review of …, 2009 – annualreviews.org

General information about the Japanese beetle in the United States by CH Hadley, IM Hawley – 1934 – books.google.com

Inhibition of herbivory on young holly leaves: evidence for the defensive role of saponins by DA Potter, TW Kimmerer – Oecologia, 1989 – Springer

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