Zone 7 Deciduous Trees: Tips On Selecting Hardy Deciduous Trees For Zone 7

The first thing to do when it comes to selecting deciduous trees for your garden is to decide which type of tree you want. There are several types of deciduous trees, but they all have one common characteristic – they lose their leaves at some point during the year. If you don’t like losing your foliage, then choose a non-deciduous tree.

However, if you enjoy having leaves, then consider choosing a deciduous tree.

Deciduous trees are considered to be those that shed their leaves at least once each year. Most species of deciduous trees only lose their leaves for short periods of time. Some species such as the ash ( Fraxinus ) and maple ( Acer negundo) never lose any of their leaves throughout the year.

Other deciduous trees such as the willow ( Salix spp. ) and poplar ( Populus spp.) shed their leaves from May through October. These are the most popular choices because they’re easy to maintain and provide a beautiful display of color year round.

Deciduous trees with leaf loss include:

Ash ( Fraxinus ), Ash, Boxwood, Cherry Tree, Chestnut, Elm ( Elaeagnus spp.), Hollyhock, Oak ( Quercus spp. ), Olive ( Olea europaea), Poplar, Rose of Sharon, Serviceberry, Sweetgum ( Liquidambar styraciflua ), Tuliptree ( Liriodendron tulipifera ), Willow ( Salix spp.

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Deciduous Trees for Zone 7

If you’re trying to decide which deciduous trees grow best in zone 7, you have many choices. All of these trees are easy to grow and will provide a great addition to your landscape.

Cherry Tree

The cherry tree ( Prunus avium ) is one of the most popular deciduous trees in the entire world. It features white flowers that bloom in the spring and produce a small edible fruit in the summer. This fruit comes in several varieties such as black, dark sweet, jewel, and wild goose.

Zone 7 Deciduous Trees: Tips On Selecting Hardy Deciduous Trees For Zone 7 - Picture

These trees are easy to maintain and provide a beautiful display of color each spring when their flowers bloom.

The cherry tree will grow best in zones 2 through 9. It can reach a mature height of between 20 and 30 feet and it has a vase-shaped form. The cherry tree can grow well in most types of soil, but it prefers rich soil.

The wood of the cherry tree is weak and it doesn’t grow well in wet or dry conditions.

Maple Tree

The red maple ( Acer rubrum ) is one of the most popular deciduous trees in North America. It produces a beautiful red, orange, or yellow color each fall that can be best seen when the leaves start to fall. The flowers of this tree bloom in the spring and produce seeds that are edible or used to make syrup.

This tree will grow best in zones 2 through 8. It can reach a mature height of between 20 and 40 feet and it has a rounded form. The maple tree can grow well in most types of soil, but it prefers acidic soil.

The wood of the red maple is strong and it grows well in most conditions.

Oak Tree

The white oak ( Quercus alba ) is one of the most popular deciduous trees in North America. It produces a beautiful display of yellow flowers each spring and fall coloration that can be seen when the leaves change colors in the fall.

Zone 7 Deciduous Trees: Tips On Selecting Hardy Deciduous Trees For Zone 7 - igrowplants.net

This tree will grow best in zones 3 through

9. It can reach a mature height of between 70 and 100 feet and it has a rounded form.

The white oak tree can grow well in most types of soil, but it prefers well-drained soil. The wood of the white oak is strong and it grows well in most conditions.

More Deciduous Trees

If you’re looking for other deciduous trees that are easy to grow in most zones, consider these:

Ashe ( Fraxinus pennsylvanica )

) Basswood ( Tilia americana )

) Catalpa ( Catalpa speciosa )

) Ginkgo ( Ginkgo biloba )

) Magnolia ( Magnolia virginiana )

) Pagoda Tree ( Styphnolobium japonicum )

You Can’t Go Wrong With Deciduous Trees

Deciduous trees are an excellent addition to any landscape. They provide shade in the summer, color in the spring and fall, and they help to keep your soil healthy. No matter which deciduous tree you decide on, you won’t be disappointed.

Zone 7 Deciduous Trees: Tips On Selecting Hardy Deciduous Trees For Zone 7 at igrowplants.net

Before adding any of these trees to your landscape, make sure that they won’t grow too large for the available space. Also make sure that you provide them with the necessary growing conditions that they require. If you do this, you’ll enjoy their presence in your landscape for many years.

Sources & references used in this article:

Non-timber uses of selected arid zone trees and shrubs in Africa by FEM Booth, GE Wickens – 1988 – books.google.com

Freezing resistance of trees in North America with reference to tree regions by A Sakai, CJ Weiser – Ecology, 1973 – Wiley Online Library

Bark properties and fire resistance of selected tree species from the central hardwood region of North America by GE Hengst, JO Dawson – Canadian Journal of Forest …, 1994 – NRC Research Press

Selecting and planting landscape trees by MR Kuhns, L Rupp – 2000 – digitalcommons.usu.edu

Canopy tree growth responses following selection harvest in seven species varying in shade tolerance by TA Jones, GM Domke… – Canadian journal of forest …, 2009 – NRC Research Press

Selection of trees for tolerance to salt injury by MA Dirr – Journal of Arboriculture, 1976 – nswooa.ca

Michigan trees, revised and updated: a guide to the trees of the Great Lakes region by BV Barnes – 2004 – books.google.com

Native trees, shrubs, & vines: a guide to using, growing, and propagating North American woody plants by W Cullina – 2002 – books.google.com

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