Indiana Planting Zone – USDA Map Of Indiana Growing Zones

The USDA plant hardiness zones are a system developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to classify the environmental conditions under which different crops may grow. Each zone represents one degree or “degrees” above the climatic average, which is generally considered to be normal temperature and precipitation. For example, the northernmost part of the continental United States is designated as zone 7a. Zone 7a is characterized by cold winters with low temperatures at night and high daytime temperatures.

The soil typically contains little organic matter; it consists mainly of sand, silt, clay and rocks. The climate there usually lasts from late fall through springtime when it warms gradually into summer.

In contrast to zone 7a, the southern half of the U.S. is designated as zone 9. Zone 9 is characterized by hot summers and cool winters with moderate rainfall during the day and heavy rain at night.

The soil typically contains some organic matter but not nearly enough to support a productive crop such as corn, wheat or soybeans. The climate there usually lasts from early winter through springtime when it cools rapidly into summer. Each of these zones fall within specific latitude ranges.

In addition to the USDA plant hardiness zones, professional horticulturists and gardeners use the term “Sunset zones” to classify the growing conditions for lawns and gardens. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) identifies 16 different zones (from 1-16) that indicate the annual minimum temperature for an area.

The first ten zones (1-10) indicate areas that are suitable for growing things outdoors throughout the year. The last six zones (11-16) indicate tropical or subtropical locations that have mild weather for at least half of the year.

Along with other factors such as soil and sun exposure, these various classifications can help gardeners and horticulturalists determine which plants and crops are most likely to thrive in any given area.

The USDA has further divided each of these 18 zones into two sub-categories: A and B. Each sub-category is defined according to the average number of “killing” days, when the temperature remains below 10 °C. (50 °F). The USDA has also set minimum temperature limits: zone A, for example, is defined as areas with an average of less than 180 “killing” days per year and a minimum annual temperature of -50 °F.

Indiana is in hardiness zones 5A and 6B.

The average annual minimum temperature in Indiana is between -10 °C and -20 °F. The average number of “killing” days per year is between 90 and 120, and the minimum temperature can be as low as -50 °F. These hardiness zone boundaries were drawn based on data from 1981 to 2010.

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SENATE BILL No.100

Indiana Planting Zones – USDA Map Of Indiana Growing Zones - Image

99TH GENERAL ASEMBLY

1ST SESSION

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INTRODUCED BY CRAIG, SHRIVER, BOWERS, LINARES, RAHM, YOUNG II, DICKENS, HERTEL, HOLDEN, ERICKSON AND WEBBER

February 25, 2015

Referred to Committee on Rules and Executive Regulations.

Introduced by Sponsor March 9, 2015

A BILL

TO AMEND SECTION 14.5 OF ARTICLE VIII AND SECTION 251.100 OF CHAPTER IV OF JOINT RULE 5 OF THE ARKANSAS STATE LEGISLATURE, 1931, (THE “CODE OF CONDUCT” AND “ETHICS COMMITTEE”, RESPECTIVELY), TO PROVIDE A CODE OF CONDUCT FOR MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL Assembly; TO AMEND SECTIONS 25-19-103 AND 25-19-104, BOTH OF THE CODES OF THE STATE OF ARKANSAS, TO REVISE THE PENALTIES FOR ETHICAL VIOLATIONS AND TO MAKE TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS; AND FOR RELATED PURPOSES.

Indiana Planting Zones – USDA Map Of Indiana Growing Zones at igrowplants.net

END

Approved by Governor: May 28, 2015

Filed with Secretary Of State: May 28, 2015

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(

1) Amend Section 251.

100, Chapter IV, Joint Rule 5, of the Arkansas Code, 1931, by deleting the word “Senate” where it appears immediately before the phrase “the legislative ethical committee,” and on line twenty-seven, on page five, by deleting the word “either” and inserting in its place the word “any.”

(

2) Amend Section 14.

5, Article VIII, of the Arkansas Constitution of 1874, as amended, by deleting section fourteen in its entirety.

Sources & references used in this article:

Development of a new USDA plant hardiness zone map for the United States by C Daly, MP Widrlechner, MD Halbleib… – Journal of Applied …, 2012 – journals.ametsoc.org

Investigating potential water quality impacts of fungicides used to combat soybean rust in Indiana by D Deb, BA Engel, J Harbor, L Hahn, KJ Lim… – Water, Air, and Soil …, 2010 – Springer

Forests of Indiana: a 1998 overview by B Tormoehlen – 2000 – books.google.com

Glades and barrens of Crawford and Perry counties, Indiana by JA Bacone, LA Casebere – Proceedings of the Indiana Academy …, 1982 – journals.iupui.edu

Impacts of climate change on the state of Indiana: ensemble future projections based on statistical downscaling by AF Hamlet, K Byun, SM Robeson, M Widhalm… – Climatic Change, 2019 – Springer

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