The Best Plants To Reduce Humidity With

Humidity is one of the most common problems when it comes to indoor gardening. When there are too many elements inside your home, such as heat or cold, moisture and light, then it becomes difficult to maintain a healthy environment. You may have noticed that even if you follow all the rules of keeping your house clean and tidy, sometimes things get dusty or dirty and smell bad.

This is because outside elements like wind, rain, snow and sun affect our atmosphere and cause dust particles to fall from the air. These particles are called airborne allergens. Dust mites are microscopic insects that live in dirt and dust. They feed on these tiny bits of living matter. If they eat enough of them, they become so small that their bodies begin to break down into pieces which can then be inhaled by humans or other animals. These airborne allergens can cause asthma attacks and other respiratory diseases.

When dust, pollen, smoke or any other type of environmental irritant enters the lungs, it causes inflammation and increases the risk of developing lung cancer.

So what do you do?

One way to prevent allergies is to keep your home clean and dry.

But how does one go about doing this?

Plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This is how they survive.

But did you know that some types of plants can also absorb other elements?

These plants are called “air cleaning plants” or “air purifying plants” because they release oxygen which cleans the air. Many of these species can also prevent sicknesses, so it’s always a good idea to keep one around.

Here is a list of plants that can help prevent sickness and allergies:

Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera is an easy to grow plant. It will release oxygen during the day and will absorb carbon monoxide at night. It is also known to have several health benefits.

It can treat burns, heal wounds, treat colds and soothe sunburns.

English Ivy

As the name suggests, English Ivy is originally from England. It can easily grow in any type of soil and even if it doesn’t get much water. It can survive with just a little bit of sunlight, making it the perfect houseplant.

Reducing Humidity With Plants: Learn About Plants That Absorb Humidity at igrowplants.net

Just like most other plants that prevent allergies, English Ivy can also eliminate formaldehyde from the air. It will also filter out xylene and toluene.

Golden Pathos

Like other plants that prevent allergies, this one is also great at eliminating chemicals and toxins such as trichloroethylene. It can also decrease the concentration of benzene and ammonia. Golden Pathos can even grow with just a small amount of light, making it an excellent choice for the bathroom or kitchen where the light is usually dim.

Pathos are a type of flowering moss, so no need to water them!

Sources & references used in this article:

Absorption of soil moisture by maize roots by CH Davis – Botanical Gazette, 1940 – journals.uchicago.edu

Growth and biochemical composition of bean plants as conditioned by soil moisture tension and salt concentration by CH Wadleigh, AD Ayers – Plant Physiology, 1945 – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Carbohydrate accumulation in the cotton plant at low moisture levels by FM Eaton, DR Ergle – Plant Physiology, 1948 – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Effect of moisture-stress on physiological activities of two contrasting wheat genotypes by RK Sairam – Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, 1994 – researchgate.net

The wilting coefficient for different plants: and its indirect determination by LJ Briggs, HLR Shantz – 1912 – books.google.com

Stomatal responses to changes in humidity in plants growing in the desert by ED Schulze, OL Lange, U Buschbom, L Kappen… – Planta, 1972 – Springer

Influence of Soil Moisture and Fertilizer Potassium on the Vegetative Growth of Mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) and Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) by UR Sangakkara, M Frehner… – Journal of Agronomy …, 2001 – Wiley Online Library

Mechanical, moisture absorption, and biodegradation behaviours of bacterial cellulose fibre-reinforced starch biocomposites by YZ Wan, H Luo, F He, H Liang, Y Huang… – Composites Science and …, 2009 – Elsevier

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