Trimming Overgrown Hazelnut Trees – How To Prune A Contorted Hazelnut Tree

In the past few years, there have been many cases where trees were severely twisted or bent. These types of trees are called contortions. They may appear like a spider web with branches growing out from one side and then twist around each other until they become impossible to climb up. Sometimes these trees will grow so tall that they completely block your view of the ground!

Contortion trees can cause significant damage to your home if not pruned properly. You need to decide whether it’s worth spending time and money on a major overhaul of your home or whether you’re better off just trimming them back and letting nature take its course.

If you want to keep your house looking good, you’ll probably have to do some work on it. If you don’t mind waiting for the weather to warm up again, then maybe it’s best that way. But if you’d rather get rid of your contorted tree right away, then here’s how to prune a contorted hazelnut tree.

How To Prune A Contorted Hazelnut Tree

The first thing you’ll need is a sturdy branch to use as a guide while you prune the tree. A good way to do this is to take off the lowest hanging branch on the tree. You’ll want to use this branch as a guide for all of your future cuts. This will ensure that your contorted hazelnut tree doesn’t simply grow back into its old shape.

Once you’ve got your guideline, cut out all the branches that hang down lower than it does. After this, the branches will start growing upward so trim them back hard any time they start growing past your guideline.

At this point, you can choose to follow the contorted shape of the tree or simply trim it back to a more manageable shape. It’s really up to you and what you want your finished product to look like. Be sure that you’re not removing so much that it won’t have enough leaves to provide enough energy for the tree to survive.

Once you’ve shaped your contorted tree to your liking, be sure to give it time to harden off before removing your guideline. Otherwise, it may begin to grow back into its old twisted shape.

Trimming Corkscrew Hazelnuts: How To Prune A Contorted Hazelnut Tree at igrowplants.net

Contorted Hazelnut Tree Pictures

This is an example of a severely contorted hazelnut tree. As you can see, this tree has completely wrapped itself around another tree and is starting to intertwine with the other shrubs nearby. This tree is a very good example of what you’d want to avoid in your yard.

This picture is of the same contorted hazelnut tree but with the shrubs and smaller trees cut away. It’s easy to see why someone would want to get rid of a tree like this. While it’s certainly an eyesore, it does provide a lot of cover for small animals and other things so there may be some good that comes out of keeping it around.

This picture is of the contorted hazelnut tree after it’s been pruned back. A lot of branches have been removed but it’s starting to resemble a normal looking tree. While this doesn’t provide as much shade, it would be a whole lot more attractive than the alternative.

These contorted hazelnut trees are a good example of trees that have grown into a gigantic mass. Normally, you can see right through the middle of them but with all the rain lately, they’re keeping a lot of it in their canopy.

Sources & references used in this article:

Growing filberts in Oregon (Revised June 1981) by CD Schwartze – 1934 – Pullman, Washington: State College …

Growing tree fruits and nuts in the home orchard by LC Baron, RL Stebbins – 1981 – ir.library.oregonstate.edu

1982 spray guide for filberts and walnuts in Oregon by RL Stebbins – 1991 – ir.library.oregonstate.edu

1983 pest management guide for filberts and walnuts in Oregon by GC Fisher, IC MacSwan – 1982 – ir.library.oregonstate.edu

519 PB 477 INHERITANCE OF CONTORTED GROWTH HABIT IN HAZELNUT by GC Fisher, IC MacSwan – 1983 – ir.library.oregonstate.edu

Nut Crops—Trees for Food, Ornament, Shade, and Wood by SA Mehlenbacher, DC Smith – HortScience, 1994 – journals.ashs.org

Improved shoot multiplication and development in hybrid hazelnut nodal cultures by ethylenediamine di-2-hydroxy-phenylacetic acid (Fe-EDDHA) by RAJ is Geneticist, HL Malstrom – naldc.nal.usda.gov

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