Crepe Myrtle Transplants: When And How To Transplant Crepe Myrtle Trees

When You Should Not Do A Crepe Myrtle Transplant

If you are not sure if you want to do a crepe myrtle transplant, then it is better to wait until next year. If you have already done one or two transplants, then you will probably feel comfortable doing another one.

But if you haven’t done any transplants yet, then it would be best to wait until next year before trying to transplant again.

There are some things that make a good reason why you shouldn’t try to transplant your crepe myrtle tree in the future. So let’s look at them first.

You may have noticed that there are many trees growing in your garden which seem to be healthy and thriving.

Why don’t you try to transplant these?

You might think that it is because they are not as big as yours. Or maybe you believe that their roots aren’t deep enough. Or perhaps they just don’t like the soil around them so much as yours does.

But what if I told you that all those reasons could actually be true? And what if I also told you that the tree that you want to transplant is quite possibly not going to survive after you put all that work into digging it up and putting it in a new location?

You really should only be transplanting trees if you feel led to do so. For example, if you were at the nursery or home store and you saw a tree that you just fell in love with and just had to have. Then by all means you should definitely get it. But if it is something that you don’t have any special feelings for, then there is no reason to dig it up.

One thing that I like to do is to just sit and look at each tree for awhile before even thinking about buying one. I let my fingers gently touch the leaves and branches.

And if I happen to be at a home store, then I take the time to look around and see what else is out there.

Sources & references used in this article:

Crape myrtle post-transplant growth as affected by nitrogen nutrition during nursery production by RI Cabrera, DR Devereaux – Journal of the American society for …, 1999 – journals.ashs.org

An effective system for brushing vegetable transplants for height control by SA Baden, JG Latimer – HortTechnology, 1992 – journals.ashs.org

Nontarget effects on crepe myrtle by Galerucella pusilla and G. calmariensis (Chrysomelidae), used for biological control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) by SS Schooler, EM Coombs, PB McEvoy – Weed Science, 2003 – cambridge.org

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