Flagstones are very popular because they provide a safe and easy way to travel around your yard. They are inexpensive and can be easily found at most home improvement stores or even online. If you want to install a flagstone path, then it’s best to do so before the weather gets too warm during summer months. You’ll need some sort of material that will not rot away quickly due to exposure to sunlight.

There are many types of materials available for flagstone walkways. Some of them include stone chips, gravel, crushed granite and sand. There are also other options such as cement, bricks and tile. Each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.

So which type is right for you?

Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of each material to help you decide what would be best for your project.

Stone Chips

These are the easiest to come across and are usually found in landscaping supply stores. These stones have been broken down into smaller pieces and mixed together. They can be used for a variety of things including flagstone paths, steps, sidewalks and even driveways. Stone chips work well when there is no moisture present in the soil.

However, if you’re going to use these stones for something else like paving streets or planting trees, you’ll need to water them regularly. When they are dry, stone chips will become very hard and will be uncomfortable for anyone to walk on.

Gravel

Gravel is a great option for your flagstone path because it’s inexpensive and easy to find. It’s also soft enough that it won’t damage anyone’s feet. If you’re planning on walking on this gravel on a regular basis, you may find that it’s best if you spread it out further than normal. This will help prevent any of the gravel from being packed too tightly together.

Crushed Granite

Crushed granite works very well for most flagstone paths. It’s also soft enough that it won’t damage anyone’s feet, and it can be just as comfortable to walk on as regular gravel. The only problem with crushed granite is that it’s quite expensive. If you need to cover a large area, then this may not be the best option for you.

Flagstone Walks: Tips For Installing A Flagstone Path - igrowplants.net

Sand

Although sand can work well on a small-scale, it is not an ideal material for building flagstone paths. The ground will become quite uneven and will be difficult to walk on if you use sand. It’s also very easy for someone to twist their ankle if they’re not careful because of how unstable the ground will be.

Concrete

Using concrete for flagstone paths is not recommended. Although concrete can be a great material for building walkways, it is too difficult to work with for most people and most don’t have the tools needed to install it. Concrete is also very heavy, making it difficult to transport.

Bricks

Bricks can be used for flagstone paths but you should only use this type of material if you’re trying to recreate an old-fashioned walkway. Using bricks on a flagstone path is also more expensive than using regular stone. If you’re going to use bricks on your walkway, then it’s best to use a border to separate the bricks from the path itself.

Tiles

Tiles are great for walkways. They can provide a nice decorative touch to your path and they’re also easy to install. If you go with tiles for your walkway, then consider getting textured ones because they will make the ground a bit more stable. If you want a stable walkway and don’t want to go with sand or gravel, then consider using a mixture of sand, small stones and mortar.

This mixture can be tiled into the ground to provide a sturdy, yet pleasing surface.

(Article by Cassie J. Walker)

Sources & references used in this article:

Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look by B Castonguay, M Thomassen – US Patent 8,500,361, 2013 – Google Patents

Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look by B Castonguay, M Thomassen – US Patent 8,747,019, 2014 – Google Patents

Artificial flagstone for providing a surface with a natural random look by B Castonguay, M Thomassen – US Patent 9,534,396, 2017 – Google Patents

Categories:

Tags:

Comments are closed