Pussy Willow Catkins: How To Get Catkins On Pussy Willows

The catkin (or catkinette) is a type of shrub or small tree native to Europe and Asia. They are typically found in moist areas such as meadows, pastures, fields, gardens and woodlands. There are many varieties of catkin but they all have one thing in common; they grow from a single trunk and branch which bear fruit.

Catkins are often used as ornamental plants because their fruits look like grapes and are edible. They may even taste better than grapes! The catkin is a popular garden plant in France, Italy, Germany, Spain and other European countries.

How To Grow Catkins On Pussy Willows?

There are several ways to grow catkins on pussies including planting them directly into the ground or using potting soil to create a shallow bed of catkins. Another option is to use a trellis system where the catkins are tied together at the top so they can’t fall over.

It’s best if you plant your catkins in early spring after the last frost date. You want to make sure that there isn’t any moisture left in the soil before planting because catkins need lots of water to thrive. If you don’t water them enough, they won’t survive long and will wither away quickly.

Plant them in rows about three feet apart and about three feet from the trellis, posts, or another type of support system. If you decide to use the shallow bed method, space the catkins about 4-6 inches apart.

Water your catkins with a gentle spray from a hose or watering can. Let the water soak into the soil and then don’t water again until the soil is dry.

If you’re growing catkins indoors, place them at a window that receives lots of sunlight. They need at least six hours of direct sunlight everyday. If you don’t have an area that gets this much sun, it’s best to use artificial lighting to illuminate their growth.

Catkin seeds need to be kept at a temperature between 50-70 degrees Fahrenheit in order to grow successfully.

It usually takes about four to six weeks for the catkin to mature once it has been planted. Each catkin pod will split open along a natural seam and will have a small tuft of white hairs at the base when it is ready to be picked. If you aren’t sure, pick one pod and open it up and take a look. Once this process starts, it will happen very quickly so you don’t want to wait too long.

Sources & references used in this article:

Selection of Willows for floral and stem quality and continuous production sequence in temperate North America by Y Kuzovkina, MF Quigley – HortTechnology, 2004 – journals.ashs.org

Nectar from willow catkins as a food source for blue tits by QON Kay – Bird Study, 1985 – Taylor & Francis

Notes on temperature measurements indicative of special organization in arctic and subarctic plants for utilization of radiated heat from the sun by J Krog – Physiologia Plantarum, 1955 – Wiley Online Library

Clarifying affiliations of Salix gracilistyla Miq. Cultivars and hybrids by YA Kuzovkina, M Dodge, IV Belyaeva – HortScience, 2016 – journals.ashs.org

Pussy Willows by C Barrus – The Plant World, 1904 – JSTOR

Elemental composition of Salix caprea L. by JH ROSENGREN – Science and Children, 1966 – JSTOR

A WINTER FIELD KEY TO WILLOWS OF PENNSYLVANIA by EB Borova, NV Borodina – 2015 – 91.234.42.22

An activity: When leaves come out by RB Gordon – Proceedings of the Pennsylvania Academy of Science, 1960 – JSTOR

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