What Is A Potato Bush?

A potato bush is a type of evergreen shrub or small tree with purple flowers. It grows from 2 to 4 feet tall and has large round leaves. Its bark is smooth and dark green, but its trunk may have several narrow branches ending in spines. The leaves are oval, light green, and hairy at the tips; they are opposite on each side of the leaf blade. They are arranged in two rows, one above the other. The plant produces small white flowers which are followed by a red seed pod.

The name “potato” comes from the Latin word pota meaning “small.” The name “bush” comes from the Greek word kurios, meaning “to grow,” and the root bous, meaning “tree.”

Blue Potato Bush: What Are Its Characteristics?

There are many types of potatoes, including Russet Burbank, Yukon Gold, Red Delicious, Golden Delicious and others. However, there is only one type called blue potato bush. These plants produce purple flowers that look like little stars. Their leaves are dark green and their stems are slender. They have no spines and do not bear seeds.

What Is The Best Way To Care For A Blue Potato Bush?

Blue potato bushes can be grown in pots or in the ground. In order to grow them in a pot, choose one that is at least 12 inches across and has several drainage holes. Fill it with soil mix that consists of three parts soil to one part each of peat moss and sand. Water the soil until it is thoroughly wet and let it drain. Plant the potato bush so that its eyes are situated a quarter of their length below the surface of the soil.

Add more soil to the pot as the plant grows. Be sure to add more peat moss or sand to the soil mix as well. Water regularly, but do not over water. These plants require at least four hours of sunlight every day.

They also need temperatures between 65 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit and at least 40% humidity. Blue potato bushes do not need a lot of fertilizer, but if you want to add some, use a half-strength general-purpose formula.

What Should I Know About Growing A Blue Potato Bush?

If your pot does not have any drainage holes, place it on a tray filled with pebbles or gravel so that the water can drain. Also, add more pebbles to the tray as the plant grows. You will need to water the plant more often this way.

Sources & references used in this article:

First record of virus infection of blue potato bush, Lycianthes rantonnetii. by P Salamon, K Nemes, K Salánki… – Journal of Plant …, 2013 – cabdirect.org

In muro fragmentation of the rhamnogalacturonan I backbone in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) results in a reduction and altered location of the galactan and … by …, CHL Doeswijk‐Voragen, MS Bush… – The Plant …, 2002 – Wiley Online Library

Developmental regulation of pectic epitopes during potato tuberisation by MS Bush, M Marry, MI Huxham, MC Jarvis… – Planta, 2001 – Springer

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