What Is A Survival Seed Vault?

A survival seed vault is a type of underground shelter or bunker designed to protect valuable items from natural disasters such as nuclear war, pandemic disease, or other man made disaster. They are typically built into mountainsides and serve as a last line of defense against possible threats. These shelters have been used in many movies including “The Road”, “Apocalypse Now” and even the TV series “Lost”.

Seed banks are not the only types of seed vaults. There are also food storage vaults, medicine storage vaults, and much more.

Some of these seed banks may contain different kinds of seeds than others. For example some stores store wheat while others store corn or rice seeds. The most common type of seed vault is one which contains seeds for various crops grown commercially in the United States and Canada (and possibly elsewhere).

How Do You Build A Survival Seed Vault?

There are several ways to build a survival seed vault. One way is to dig a hole in the ground, fill it with dirt and then cover it up with soil. Another method is to use concrete blocks or bricks as the foundation. Both methods will work but they both have their disadvantages.

Building A Hole In The Ground

The first way is to make a hole in the ground and then line it with plastic. This will keep water from seeping into the seed vault and will allow you to stack boxes of seeds deep into the ground.

You can then fill dirt back in around the plastic lined hole and cover it with grass or whatever other type of ground cover you want. This may be the best way to hide your survival seed vault.

Building A Concrete Vault

The second way is to build a concrete wall and then place a door into the wall. This will provide protection from water seepage and keep out any looters or other people who might want to steal your seeds.

If you live in an area that gets a lot of snow you may want to build your survival seed vault under your house.

Sources & references used in this article:

Seed storage behavior: a compendium by TD Hong, S Linington, RH Ellis – 1996 – cgspace.cgiar.org

The ecological significance of canopy seed storage in fire‐prone environments: a model for non‐sprouting shrubs by NJ Enright, R Marsula, BB Lamont… – Journal of …, 1998 – Wiley Online Library

Germinating seeds or bulbils in 87 of 113 tested Arctic species indicate potential for ex situ seed bank storage by IG Alsos, E Müller, PB Eidesen – Polar Biology, 2013 – Springer

Seedling survival and seed size: a synthesis of the literature by AT Moles, M Westoby – Journal of Ecology, 2004 – Wiley Online Library

Seed and seedling ecology of tree species in neotropical secondary forests: management implications by MR Guariguata – Ecological applications, 2000 – Wiley Online Library

Intracellular glasses and seed survival in the dry state by J Buitink, O Leprince – Comptes rendus biologies, 2008 – Elsevier

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