Growing Pink Evening Primrose – How To Care For Pink Evening Primrose

Pink evening primroses are a small flowering plant with yellow flowers. They grow from spring to autumn.

There are several species of nightshade plants which include: morning glory (Apocynum), dill weed (Allium cepa), garlic mustard (Brassicas odorata) and chives (Alliaria petiolaris). These are all members of the same family Alliaceae.

The name “pink” refers to their bright red color. Other names used for them include: red evening primrose, red evening primrose, purple evening primrose, blue afternoon primrose and pink morning glory.

Pink evening primroses have been cultivated since ancient times. They were first grown in China during the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

Later they were brought to Europe by the Romans. They became popular in England around the 15th century. They were also widely grown in France during the 17th century.

In 1824, botanist William Henry Hearst introduced them to America. He named one of these plants after himself, “Hearst’s Pink”.

At that time there was no scientific name for it yet because its color was so unusual at that time.

In the 19th century, several new hybrid varieties of pink evening primrose began to appear in gardens. These were named “Evening Glow”, “Crimson Glow” and “Rose Glow”.

Today, the plants are grown all over the world. They have become naturalized in some areas.

Native American tribes use different types of pink evening primroses for medicinal purposes. They also eat the seeds as food. Some tribes use similar types of this plant for religious and ritualistic purposes.

There are several types of pink evening primroses. Some of these types include: Evening Light (Oenothera biennis), Royal Blush (Oenothera speciosa), Nana (Oenothera fruticosa), Cutleaf Evening Primrose (Oenothera laciniata), Sulfur Flower (Oenothera r concentration).

If you prefer the edible plants, search for a greenbay tree (Allium trabemum) and a wild onion (Allium canadense). Both grow wild in large areas of the United States.

Growing Pink Evening Primrose – How To Care For Pink Evening Primrose - Picture

In terms of garden maintenance, note that some types of pink evening primroses are annuals, while others are perennials. Also, they can be considered hardy in most areas of the country.

You can see that the pink evening primrose is a beautiful plant with a long history. If you are looking for a flower to liven up your garden, then consider planting some pink evening primroses.

In general the process of growing pink evening primrose is not complicated. Usually plants grown from seeds will flower within three years.

However, it takes a lot of patience since sometimes a plant may take up to five years to bloom.

To grow pink evening primrose from seed, you should plant the seeds between September and October. This is known as “stratifying” them.

This means exposing the seeds to a period of cold temperatures for around three months. Most nurseries will advise you on this process.

Most seeds will need a germination temperature of around 70°F to 85°F (21°C to 29°C). The soil you use should be light and well-draining.

Make sure it is not too wet. Check the soil moisture with your fingertips since if the soil is too wet the seeds may rot.

After planting, cover the seeds with very thin layer of fine sand, vermiculite or perlite to keep the seeds at the correct depth while allowing light in. This will also maintain the ideal soil temperature for germination.

Growing Pink Evening Primrose – How To Care For Pink Evening Primrose - Picture

Place the container somewhere bright, but out of direct sunlight. Germination may take a few weeks or up to several months.

Once the plants are big enough to handle, transplant them to individual containers. Transplant outdoors once there is no danger of frost and when the plants are at least 4 inches (10 cm) tall.

Space the plants 12 to 18 inches (30 to 46 cm) apart.

The most common types of pink evening primroses are: Oenothera grandis, Oenothera macrocalyx and Oenothera fruticosa. Primrose plants prefer a well-draining soil and lots of sun.

They also grow best in areas with cool to cold weather.

The pink evening primrose is a beautiful wildflower native to North America. There are several different types of this flower that range in size, color and growing conditions.

The showy evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa) is a wildflower that is native to the central and western U.S.

and parts of northern Mexico. This plant typically grows best in dry, sandy or loamy soil that is well-draining, but it can also grow in clay soil as long as there is adequate drainage. This is a very hardy plant that can grow in full sun to partial shade and is more tolerant of drought conditions than the common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis). In fact, it can even regrow from its large roots after a wildfire. This plant will typically grow to be between 1 to 3 feet (.3 to .9 meters) tall. The stems and leaves are covered with fine hairs, and the flowers are yellow.

The common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis) is a wildflower that is native to most of North America, but it grows best in moist or wet soil. This plant will typically grow to be between 2 to 6 feet (.6 to 1.8 meters) tall and has hairy stems, leaves and flower parts.

The flowers are yellow, and the petals have a distinctive ruffled appearance.

The cutleaf evening primrose (Oenothera laciniata) is a wildflower native to most of North America. It typically grows best in dry or sandy soil that is well-draining, but like the showy evening primrose, it can also grow in clay soil as long as there is adequate drainage.

This plant will typically only reach a height of between 1 to 3 feet (.3 to .9 meters). It has hairy stems, leaves and flower parts. The flowers are yellow.

Planting and care

How you plant your pink evening primrose seeds is very important. If you live in an area that has cold winters, the best time to plant your seeds is between September and October.

Growing Pink Evening Primrose – How To Care For Pink Evening Primrose - igrowplants.net

This should give them plenty of time to grow roots and get a good start before winter comes.

Sources & references used in this article:

Germination and viability of weed seeds after 2.5 years in a 50-year buried seed study by GH Egley, JM Chandler – Weed Science, 1978 – JSTOR

A Garden Study of Sundrops and Evening Primroses by W GARDENS – chicagobotanic.org

Proper Fall Garden Preparation for Spring Planting: Fall and Winter by VA Smith – auntiedogmasgardenspot.wordpress …

Oenothera Species (Evening Primrose): In Vitro Regeneration, Production of Flavonoids, Fatty Acids, and Other Secondary Metabolites by L Skrzypczak, B Thiem, M Wesołowska – Medicinal and Aromatic Plants X, 1998 – Springer

Field study of Texas native evening primrose and evaluation of selected seed treatments by CL Murphy – 2000 – ttu-ir.tdl.org

Influence of planting date and insecticide treatment on insect pest abundance and damage in dryland cotton by JE Slosser – Journal of economic entomology, 1993 – academic.oup.com

XIV Oenothera Species (Evening Primrose): In Vitro Regeneration, Production of Flavonoids, Fatty Acids, and Other Secondary Metabolites by L SKRZYPCZAK, B THIEM… – … and Aromatic Plants X, 2012 – books.google.com

Planning & Planting a Moon Garden: Storey’s Country Wisdom Bulletin A-234 by M Shaffer – 2001 – books.google.com

Intentions for the unintentional: Spontaneous vegetation as the basis for innovative planting design in urban areas by HH Thomas – 1917 – Cassell, Limited

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