Winter Aconite Poisonous To Touch?

It is true that it is possible to get frostbite from touching winter aconite plants. However, there are other ways to deal with frostbite than just getting out of the cold. There are many things that can be done if you have frostbitten fingers or toes. You might want to consult your doctor before doing any of these things!

The first thing to do is to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. Then, apply ice packs on your fingers until they feel numb. If you still feel pain after applying ice packs, then call 911 immediately because you need immediate medical attention. Also, try not to move them too much while waiting for emergency services to arrive so that they don’t become chilled.

If you think that your fingers or toes are frozen, then take them to a doctor right away. They will remove the ice packs and give you some pain medication. You may also be given antibiotics or antifungals depending on what kind of infection you have.

Also, if you are going to be using gloves when handling winter aconite plants, make sure that they fit well enough so that they won’t slip off during use. It is also important to make sure that they are made of some sort of material that doesn’t easily conduct the cold. This way, you can minimize the amount of cold that gets into your hands and fingers.

However, before you go out and buy special gardening gloves, you should try to protect your hands with whatever you have on hand first. For example, you can use a plastic bag that is at least double bagged over your hand to protect it while you’re planting your winter aconite plants.

Will Winter Aconite Poison You?

The short answer is yes, although the long answer doesn’t follow what most people think. In fact, the ways that it can poison you are not at all related to its effects on your skin or its roots.

Sources & references used in this article:

Important poisonous plants in Tibetan ethnomedicine by L Ma, R Gu, L Tang, ZE Chen, R Di, C Long – Toxins, 2015 – mdpi.com

Handbook of poisonous and injurious plants by LS Nelson, RD Shih, MJ Balick, KF Lampe – 2007 – Springer

Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin by AU Hivrale, AG Ingale – Plant signaling & behavior, 2013 – Taylor & Francis

Aconitum alkaloid poisoning related to the culinary uses of aconite roots by TYK Chan – Toxins, 2014 – mdpi.com

Medical botany: plants affecting human health by WH Lewis, MPF Elvin-Lewis – 2003 – books.google.com

Midwest Gardener’s Handbook: Your Complete Guide: Select-Plan-Plant-Maintain-Problem-solve-Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota … by M Myers – 2013 – books.google.com

Medicinal plants of the world by BE Van Wyk, M Wink – 2018 – books.google.com

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