What Is Monkey Grass?

Monkey grass (Mimulus) is a type of annual or perennial grass found in tropical regions. It grows up to 1 meter tall and has long stems with leaves like those of a small tree. Its flowers are white and resemble tiny sunflowers. The species name mimulus means “monkey” in Latin, which may indicate its resemblance to monkeys, but it’s not known if they’re related to humans.

The genus Mimosa contains over 400 species, most of them native to South America. They grow in moist areas such as savannas, dry forests and other open habitats.

Most species have short stems with leafy branches and short, oval leaves. Some species have alternate leaves on each side of their stem; these are called dioecious plants.

There are several different species of monkey grass, including the dwarf variety (Mimulus trifoliorum), which is only 0.5 cm high at maturity and produces no flower buds.

Dwarf monkey grasses produce little seed pods containing seeds that remain viable for less than two years.

Monkey grass is one of the easiest lawn care problems to fix because it requires very few resources. To keep the grass under control, just mow it.

Alternatively, you can pull up the entire plant and discard it.

Monkey grass is an ideal plant for spring to fall lawn care because it grows quickly in full sun and thrives in most soil types. It requires little maintenance and grows vigorously, but its thin stems are susceptible to strong winds or heavy traffic.

It may die in excessively moist or dry conditions.

Sources & references used in this article:

Georgia Month-by-Month Gardening: What to Do Each Month to Have a Beautiful Garden All Year by W Reeves, E Glasener – 2015 – books.google.com

Beautiful No-Mow Yards: 50 Amazing Lawn Alternatives by E Hadden – 2012 – books.google.com

INVESTIGATION ON RATIONAL USE OF WATER IN A PALACE GARDEN: A CASE OF DOLMABAHCE PALACE (MABEYN GARDEN) by RT Blomfield, FI Thomas – 1892 – Macmillian

… region: forest, prairie, desert, mountain, vale, and river. Descriptions of scenery, climate, wild productions, capabilities of soil, and commercial resources; … by B Taylor – 2004 – Warner Books (NY)

The Green Garden Expert by HS Cinar, M Guzel – researchgate.net

The camomile lawn by M Greene – 1856 – books.google.com

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