Care Of Red Maple Trees: How To Grow A Red Maple Tree

How To Plant A Red Maple Tree

Red maple trees are known as the most beautiful of all the maples. They have a reddish color and they grow very fast.

There are different kinds of red maples such as white, pink, purple, yellow and black. Some varieties may even look like oaks or elms but with red leaves instead of green ones. Red maples are easy to grow and they require little care.

The best time to plant a red maple tree is in spring when the soil temperature is warm enough for them to sprout easily. The seedlings will need plenty of sunlight during their first year so make sure that your house is well lit at night.

If possible, try planting them in pots rather than directly into the ground because it’s easier for them to root themselves.

If you want to buy a red maple tree, then you’ll probably have to wait until the next winter before you can get one. That’s why it makes sense to start planting now if you’re planning on buying one.

You don’t necessarily need a large amount of money to purchase a red maple tree either; there are many places where people sell them for cheap. Just remember that the price will go up after several years since they’ve grown larger and become more expensive.

How To Care For A Red Maple Tree

Care Of Red Maple Trees: How To Grow A Red Maple Tree - Image

Caring for a red maple tree is actually very easy. At first, you should water the tree daily and keep weeds away from the base of the tree.

Once it’s bigger, you can reduce watering to once or twice a week as long as the soil isn’t dry. Water the entire area around the tree rather than just the roots because this helps keep away pesky weeds that could potentially dehydrate your tree.

As it gets older, you may notice some brown spots on some of the leaves. This is called ‘mosaicing’ and isn’t really a problem as long as it only occurs on a small portion of the tree.

If this happens to more than half of the tree’s leaves, then it could be due to too much water. Try watering the tree less and see if the mosaic pattern starts going away.

If you have small children and pets, then it might be a good idea to put in a barrier around the tree so that they don’t mess with it. Although red maples are sturdy and resilient, they can be tipped over by large animals such as deer or even by the very people that care for them.

This could potentially kill your beautiful red maple tree so be careful.

Buying A Red Maple Tree

You can also buy a red maple tree rather than growing your own from seed. Usually, these kinds of trees are very reasonably priced and you can get large ones for about $20.

Large red maples can be as much as $100 so this is another reason why buying one is very affordable. You can even look on the internet for websites or stores that sell them. There are many different kinds of red maple trees and some are even rare. It’s possible to buy one that’s perfect for your yard and your taste.

Sources & references used in this article:

… Apple Tree Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Nursery-Grown Red Maples: Phenology of Emergence, Treatment Timing, and Response to Stressed Trees by DA Potter, GM Timmons… – Journal of …, 1988 – meridian.allenpress.com

The effects of low‐level consumption by canopy arthropods on the growth and nutrient dynamics of black locust and red maple trees in the southern Appalachians by TR Seastedt, DA Crossley Jr, WW Hargrove – Ecology, 1983 – Wiley Online Library

Response of interveinally chlorotic red maple trees treated with medicaps or by soil acidification by A Steven Messenger, BA Hruby – Journal of …, 1990 – meridian.allenpress.com

Rapid capture of growing space by red maple by S Fei, KC Steiner – Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 2009 – NRC Research Press

Acer rubrum L. Red maple by RS Walters, HW Yawney – Silvics of North America, 1990 – books.google.com

Environmental control of whole-plant transpiration, canopy conductance and estimates of the decoupling coefficient for large red maple trees by SD Wullschleger, KB Wilson, PJ Hanson – Agricultural and Forest …, 2000 – Elsevier

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