Colonial Garden Plants: Tips For Growing And Designing Colonial Period Gardens

The following are some tips for growing and designing colonial period gardens. These tips will make your life easier when it comes to planning your own colonial period garden.

You may use these tips in order to plan out your own colonial period garden or you may simply learn them so that you can have better success with your own colonial period garden!

1) Choose a suitable location for your garden.

You must choose a suitable place where you want to plant your garden. If you don’t like the idea of having a small space, then choose another one.

However if you do not have any other choice but to have only small space, then go ahead and build a small garden there.

2) Use soil amendments.

Use earthworms and composted manure. Also add organic matter such as wood chips, leaves, grass clippings, etc., into the ground to increase fertility levels.

Add some rocks or stones to improve drainage conditions. Do not forget to water regularly!

3) Choose appropriate plants for your garden.

Colonial Garden Plants: Tips For Growing And Designing Colonial Period Gardens - igrowplants.net

Choose plants which are easy to grow and maintainable because they require little attention from you at all times (like herbs). Also choose plants that are native to your area because they are more suitable for your environment.

4) Build a fence around your garden.

If you want a privacy fence then build it around the entire area, and if you want to keep animals out, build it just around the perimeter of your garden. It is important to build a fence because it helps protect your plants from wandering off and getting lost!

5) Maintain your garden regularly.

Sources & references used in this article:

Homogeneity of urban biotopes and similarity of landscape design language in former colonial cities by M Ignatieva, GH Stewart – 2009 – dspace.lincoln.ac.nz

The pleasure gardens of Virginia: from Jamestown to Jefferson by P Martin – 2017 – books.google.com

Of planting and planning: The making of British colonial cities by R Home – 2013 – books.google.com

Colonial botany: science, commerce, and politics in the early modern world by L Schiebinger, C Swan – 2007 – books.google.com

Sowing empire: Landscape and colonization by JH Casid – 2005 – books.google.com

Heirloom Vegetable Gardening: A Master Gardener’s Guide to Planting, Seed Saving, and Cultural History by WW Weaver – 2018 – books.google.com

Microbial community structure of leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens and refuse dumps by JJ Scott, KJ Budsberg, G Suen, DL Wixon, TC Balser… – PloS one, 2010 – journals.plos.org

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