Wildflower Seeds For Gardeners Who Are New To Gardening And Do Not Know How To Choose Which Plants Will Work Best For Them

The following are some tips which will help you choose the best plants for your garden. These tips are based on our experience with growing gardens and working with many different types of plants. You may have to adjust these suggestions according to your own circumstances and preferences.

Plant Wildflowers Early In Spring (Zone 5)

If you want to grow flowers in zone 5, start planting them early in spring. If you live in a colder climate where it snows heavily during the winter months, then it is better not to plant any flowers at all until after the snow melts. Also remember that if you do plant them too soon they may die from freezing temperatures or even sunburn.

When choosing wildflowers for your garden, look for ones that bloom in the springtime. They usually flower in March and April. Most of the time they will only bloom once a year but sometimes they can last several years!

Some examples include:

Bluebells – blossom every other month; blooms from late February through mid-April. Bluebells are very easy to grow and make lovely additions to almost any garden.

Anemones – blossom in late April and early May. Anemones have a lovely fragrance to them but can sometimes become a little invasive in the garden.

Wild Columbine – blossom from mid-April to the beginning of May. They are very easy to grow and they can grow very quickly (sometimes overnight!) if given the right conditions.

Sample List Of Some Native Wildflowers To Plant In Your Zone 5 Garden

The following is a list of some native wildflowers that you can plant in your garden. These plants are very easy to grow and will thrive in almost any soil conditions. This list is by no means complete; there are many more types of flowers than this list mentions.

Black-Eyed Susans

Bee Balm

Wildflowers For Zone 5 Gardens: Tips On Planting Wildflowers In Zone 5 - igrowplants.net

Bee Plant

Bellflower

Blood Root

Blue Bells

Blue-Eyed Grass

Blue Flax

Catesby Rhododendron

Cat-O-The-Mountains (Or Mountain Lilac)

Columbine (Lesser)

Wildflowers For Zone 5 Gardens: Tips On Planting Wildflowers In Zone 5 at igrowplants.net

Columbine (Sweet)

Common Cinquefoil

Common Fleabane (Savin)

Common Snapdragon

Culver’s Root

Dwarf Indian Pink (Cranesbill)

Eastern Pasque Flower

Felt Fern

Fire Pink (Low)

Fire Pink (High)

Wildflowers For Zone 5 Gardens: Tips On Planting Wildflowers In Zone 5 on igrowplants.net

Flame Azalea (low)

Fleabane (Russian)

Goldenseal (Yellow)

Grey-Headed Coneflower

Heart-Leaf Plantain (Rose)

Heart-Leaf Plantain (White)

Hepatica (Common)

Hepatica (Tall)

Hound’s Tongue

Indian Paintbrush (Common)

Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Green-Spored)

Jack-in-the-Pulpit (White-Spored)

Wildflowers For Zone 5 Gardens: Tips On Planting Wildflowers In Zone 5 | igrowplants.net

Lance-Leaved Coreopsis

Large Whorled Pogonia (Waxy Pink)

Leather Flower

Lizard’s Tail (Coast)

Lizard’s Tail (Dwarf)

Meadowsweet (Early)

Meadowsweet (Late)

Mountain Avens

New England Asters

Northern Bedstraw (Purple)

Pink Turtlehead

Pipsissewa (Common) (Low)

Pipsissewa (Common) (High)

Wildflowers For Zone 5 Gardens: Tips On Planting Wildflowers In Zone 5 - igrowplants.net

Pipsissewa (Ozark)

Prairie Blazing Star

Prairie Clovers

Prairie Corn Mint

Prairie Gentian (Spotted)

Purple Coneflower (Bushy)

Purple Coneflower (Erect)

Rock Stonecrop (Common)

Rue Anemone (Thin-Leaf)

Rue Anemone (White-Rayed)

Sand Pink (Low)

Wildflowers For Zone 5 Gardens: Tips On Planting Wildflowers In Zone 5 at igrowplants.net

Sand Pink (High)

Sawtooth Loosestrife (Purple)

Sawtooth Loosestrife (Red)

Shortia (Common)

Silverbell (Eastern)

Small Flowered Germander

Small Flowered Yellow Loosestrife

Small Prairie Clovers

Small Spurred Violet (Northern)

Small Spurred Violet (Southern)

Smooth Angled

Sources & references used in this article:

The New England Wild Flower Society guide to growing and propagating wildflowers of the United States and Canada by W Cullina – 2000 – books.google.com

Roadside wildflower meadows: summary of benefits and guidelines to successful establishment and management by AO Epple – 1997 – Globe Pequot

Native trees, shrubs, & vines: a guide to using, growing, and propagating North American woody plants by J Ahern, CA Niedner, A Barker – Transportation research record, 1992 – onlinepubs.trb.org

Categories:

Tags:

Comments are closed