What are Illini Hardy Blackberries?

Illini hardy blackberries are a type of cold-hardiness blackberry. They have been grown in Illinois since the early 1900’s. These plants grow well in zones 3 through 7 (except for the northernmost part). Illini hardy blackberries can withstand extreme temperatures ranging from -20°F (-30°C) to 125°F (52°C), but they will not survive frost. Illini hardy blackberries are known for their high yields. A typical yield is between 20 and 30 pounds per acre (7 to 10 kilograms per hectare).

How To Grow Illini Hardy Blackberries?

You can start growing these blackberries in spring or summer. You can plant them outdoors or indoors. If you want to grow them outside, make sure that your soil is fertile and moist before planting. Planting outdoors means that you need to keep the soil moist during the winter months.

If you want to plant them inside, then you must prepare your garden space before planting. First of all, dig a hole at least 12 inches deep and six feet wide.

Then fill it with potting mix. Next, cover the bottom of the garden with plastic sheeting so that no water gets into your garden area. Make sure that the plastic sheeting overlaps the edges of the garden by 6 inches. Then, place your blackberry crowns inside the garden. Cover them with a 2-inch layer of soil and water well.

You must plant at least three crowns per 10 linear feet (3 meters). Plant five or more crowns if you want to have a higher yield.

Make sure that you space your plants around 4 to 5 feet apart.

Sources & references used in this article:

Worldwide blackberry production by BC Strik, JR Clark, CE Finn, MP Bañados – HortTechnology, 2007 – journals.ashs.org

Changing times for eastern United States blackberries by JR Clark – HortTechnology, 2005 – journals.ashs.org

Blackberries by EB Poling – Journal of Small Fruit & Viticulture, 1997 – Taylor & Francis

Thornless blackberries for the home garden by JW Hull – 1973 – books.google.com

Blackberry Cultivars and Production Trends by BC STRIK – Fruit Varieties Journal, 1992 – horticulture.oregonstate.edu

Blackberry: World production and perspectives by JR Clark – III Simpósio nacional do morango, II Encontro sobre …, 2006 – core.ac.uk

Blackberries by CE Finn – Temperate fruit crop breeding, 2008 – Springer

Bramble production: The management and marketing of raspberries and blackberries by PC Crandall – 1995 – books.google.com

Thornlessness in blackberries: A review by MA Coyner, RM Skirvin, MA Norton… – Small fruits …, 2005 – Taylor & Francis

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