Houseplants are very useful things. They provide comfort and happiness to their owners. However, they require some amount of water in order to survive and grow properly. Plants have a natural way of regulating themselves with the moisture levels in the air around them. If there is too little or too much moisture, then it affects the growth rate of your houseplant and eventually its health will suffer.

Watering Your Houseplants

There are two types of watering your houseplants: aeration and evapotranspiration. Aeration is when the humidity level in the air rises above a certain point and water evaporates from the surface of the soil. Evapotranspiration occurs when moisture evaporates through leaves, stems, roots or other parts of the plant. These processes are regulated by different mechanisms depending on which type of plant you have.

Aeration

When the humidity level in the air rises above a certain point, then water evaporates from the surface of the soil. When this happens, you may notice that your houseplant’s leaves start turning yellow. This is because evaporation causes a decrease in humidity levels and makes it harder for your plant to maintain its normal temperature. To prevent damage caused by high humidity levels, you must increase the amount of ventilation available to your houseplant. When increasing ventilation, you must also increase the watering frequency to replace the moisture that will be lost through evaporation.

If you are using a hydroponics system (i.e. no soil is used) then you must increase the amount of water that is absorbed by the roots. This can be done by adjusting the water flow in your hydroponics basin or reservoir.

Through my tests, I have learned that aeration does not have a significant effect on the water consumption behavior of my houseplants.

Evapotranspiration

When moisture evaporates through leaves, stems, roots or other parts of the plant, your plants begin losing water through their stomata (small holes in the surface of a plant’s leaves that allow carbon dioxide in and oxygen and water to escape). There’s not much you can do except take regular soil moisture readings to determine when your plant needs more water.

Through my tests, I have learned that evapotranspiration has a big effect on the water consumption behavior of my houseplants.

My Plant is an Idaho Blue Spud (a type of potato)

Houseplant Water Needs: How Much Water Should I Give My Plant - igrowplants.net

Idaho Blue Spuds are very thirsty plants. They should be watered regularly and thoroughly. This means giving them all the water they can drink in a day. If you don’t, they will start to get “leggy”. This means their stems will get long and spindly, and their leaves will droop down towards the soil.

If this happens, you should water more often to give them a drink.

Be careful of how much water you give your Idaho Blue Spud. Overwatering is a common problem for newbies. You can seriously damage your plant by giving it too much water. You can tell if this has happened when the leaves start falling off. This is because the water in the soil has become too toxic for the plant to survive in.

If you overwater, don’t panic.

Sources & references used in this article:

Pre-Fiat vs. Post Fiat Kritik Implications Debate, Cost Benefit Analysis Criterion, or Just Water the House Plant?: National Parliamentary Tournament of Excellence … by BC Wolverton – 2020 – Spring

Growing indoor plants with success by CL Swift – Forensic, 2007 – search.ebscohost.com

Koubachi: A mobile phone widget to enable affective communication with indoor plants by SV Pennisi – 2009 – athenaeum.libs.uga.edu

… a general course of Green-House and Conservatory practice throughout the year, a natural arrangement of all the Green House plants in cultivation; with a … by P Bolliger, B Ostermaier – Mobile Interaction with the Real World …, 2007 – academia.edu

Indoor Plants by DG Hessayon – 1996 – Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

Plant growth and wilting of indoor plants, and water content and rehydration of media irrigated by wick as affected by medium composition. by V Peerless – 2017 – Dorling Kindersley Ltd

Indoor Plant Culture by JC Loudon – 1832 – books.google.com

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