Spearmint Care: Learn How To Grow Spearmint Herbs

How to Grow Spearmint Herbs?

The most common question asked by people interested in growing spearmint is “how do I grow spearmint?”

The answer is simple. You just need to follow the steps given here. If you are not sure what these steps mean, then please read our tutorial on Growing Mint Plants.

Step 1: Choose A Plant Type That Will Do Well Under Your Environment

Growing spearmint requires a climate that is warm enough to allow it to thrive, but not too hot or cold. You will want to choose a plant type with the ability to survive both summer and winter temperatures. Some types of plants such as sunflowers and dahlias can withstand heat extremes better than others like ferns or sedums.

If you live in a colder region, then your best bet would be to use a variety of different varieties of spearmint. These include spearmints grown outdoors, indoor varieties and even seeds. There are many different kinds of spearmint available for purchase online. However, if you don’t have access to any kind of outdoor space where you could grow your own spearmint plants, then there are also some indoor strains that will work well for growing purposes.

Step 2: Find A Well-Draining Soil Mix For Your Herb Garden

The next part of the process is to find a well-draining soil mix for your garden. This is important because moisture retention can be a problem when growing herbs, and can cause some plants to become diseased or even stop growing altogether. Most herbs need looser soil that won’t retain too much water.

You can create your own well-draining soil mix by combining 2 parts of soil, 1 part pumice or very coarse sand and 1 part organic matter such as peat moss, compost or rotted leaves. Remember, looser soil means less water retention! You should also add some slow-release fertilizer to the soil before planting. Make sure to only add a little bit at a time and then gently mix it in so that the fertilizer will spread out over a larger area.

Step 3: Sow Your Spearmint Seeds

Sow your spearmint seeds about 1/4 inch deep in your soil, making sure that they are spread out within the soil so that they are not planted too closely together. Use a ruler or other straight edge to make straight rows if you are concerned about aesthetics.

Many people tend to plant their herbs at the beginning of spring or in the early part of the year. This ensures that your herbs will have time to grow before the weather gets too hot. If you are planting your spearmint outdoors, then you will want to wait until all danger of frost has passed before you begin this process.

Step 4: Water Your Spearmint Plants Thoroughly

Water your spearmint plants thoroughly right after planting. Then keep the soil consistently moistened but not overly wet.

Sources & references used in this article:

Spearmint herbal tea has significant anti‐androgen effects in polycystic ovarian syndrome. A randomized controlled trial by P Grant – … Research: An International Journal Devoted to …, 2010 – Wiley Online Library

Influence of salt stress on growth and essential oil production in peppermint, pennyroyal, and apple mint by EE Aziz, H Al-Amier, LE Craker – … herbs, spices & medicinal plants, 2008 – Taylor & Francis

Powdered herbs of the mint family (Lamiaceae) as insect repellents for protection of stored wheat grain. by S Ignatowicz – Polskie Pismo Entomologiczne, 1997 – cabdirect.org

Mint: the genus Mentha by BM Lawrence – 2006 – books.google.com

Optimal level of iron and zinc in relation to its influence on herb yield and production of essential oil in menthol mint by P Pande, M Anwar, S Chand, VK Yadav… – … Soil Science and Plant …, 2007 – Taylor & Francis

Nimin and Mentha spicata oil as nitrification inhibitors for optimum yield of Japanese mint by DD Patra, M Anwar, S Chand, U Kiran… – … soil science and plant …, 2002 – Taylor & Francis

Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Potential of Aqueous Distillate Volatiles of Indian Peppermint (Mentha piperita) and Spearmint (Mentha spicata) by RS Verma, V Pandey, RC Padalia… – … & medicinal plants, 2011 – Taylor & Francis

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