GREEK ORGANO INFO – HOW TO GROW GREEK ORANGE PLANTS

The first thing you need to know is that there are two types of oreganos: the “wild” type which grows wild all over Greece, and the cultivated variety which is grown commercially. Wild type oreganos grow only in Greece and they have very few natural enemies (other than humans). They produce no toxins or other substances that could harm you when eaten. However, if you eat them, you will probably get sick.

Cultivated varieties are farmed in Italy and Spain where they are sprayed with pesticides before being sold to grocery stores across America. These varieties are not as toxic as their wild counterparts but they still contain chemicals that may cause cancer and other diseases. You can read more about the dangers of these kinds of foods here .

There is another kind of oregano called “Greek oregano”. It is cultivated in Greece and produces no toxins whatsoever. It is used to make a tea that is popular among Greeks because it tastes good and helps relieve pain.

Growing oregano plants indoors requires careful attention to watering, fertilizing, and light levels. If you want to grow your own oregano plants then you will need to follow some basic guidelines.

How To Grow Greek Oregano Plants Indoors?

You can grow them from seeds. This is the cheapest and most reliable way to grow oregano plants. The seeds can be planted in small pots (1-gallon size) after you have soaked them in water overnight. If you are using a grow light or a sunny windowsill then you can start them in small pots.

You can also start them directly in the garden using seedling trays if you have a greenhouse or a warm sunny windowsill.

Sources & references used in this article:

Chitosan oligosaccharides promote the content of polyphenols in Greek oregano (Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum) by H Yin, XC Fretté, LP Christensen… – Journal of agricultural …, 2012 – ACS Publications

Antioxidant activities and phenolic composition of extracts from Greek oregano, Greek sage, and summer savory by V Exarchou, N Nenadis, M Tsimidou… – Journal of agricultural …, 2002 – ACS Publications

Field studies of nitrogen application on growth and yield of Greek oregano (Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum (Link) Ietswaart) by DE Sotiropoulou, AJ Karamanos – Industrial Crops and Products, 2010 – Elsevier

Autumn essential oils of Greek oregano by S Kokkini, R Karousou, A Dardioti, N Krigas, T Lanaras – Phytochemistry, 1997 – Elsevier

Analysis of effective factors on information sources at Turkish Oregano farms by O Koksal, E Gunes, OO Ozer… – African Journal of …, 2010 – academicjournals.org

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