Japanese Tree Lilacs (Tropaeolum majus) are a group of flowering plants native to Japan. They are widely distributed throughout the country with some species being endemic to certain areas. There are over 300 species of these lilacs, but only three or four have been studied extensively: T. minutissima, T. purpurea and T. rubrae. All three species grow in forests and woodlands, although T. minutissima grows most commonly in coniferous forest types; T. purpurea is found primarily in deciduous woodland types; and T. rubrae occurs mainly in mixed hardwood/coniferous forest types. The lilacs are often called “tree lilies” because they resemble small trees.

The Japanese lilac tree is a member of the genus Tropaeolum, which includes many other members of the family Liliaceae, including the rose (Rosa), holly (Ilex), ash (Fraxinus), maple (Acer spp.), dogwood (Cornus florida) and poplar (Populus). The name “Ivory Silk Lilac” refers to a specific hybrid, a cross between T. purpurea and T. minutissima, which has gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit (AGM).

Lilac trees are extremely fast-growing and require little maintenance. They can grow up to 15 feet in height and 6 feet in width within a year. In fact, in some parts of the world where they have been imported, they are considered invasive species.

You may have seen many japanese tree lilacs in your community. You may have even planted one yourself. This beautiful, awe-inspiring tree is found all over the United States and around the world. It is a favorite of gardeners everywhere, and its clean, fresh look fits in perfectly in any landscape. However, this lovely species can become a nightmare for homeowners if proper care is not taken.

Japanese Tree Lilac Care

The Ivory Silk Lilac is a beautiful tree, but can become a nightmare for homeowners if they don’t take proper care of it. Proper maintenance of the tree includes annual pruning and regular inspections of the trunk and branches for signs of insects or disease. This can be a time consuming process for homeowners who work long hours and can lead to a lot of stress. That’s where our Japanese Tree Lilac Care Service comes in. Our expert team of gardeners will take care of your tree – and your worries – so you don’t have to!

At Japanese Tree Lilac Care Service, we provide high quality, affordable tree care for the whole Denver area. Using the latest techniques and most advanced equipment, our skilled gardeners can help your japanese tree lilac thrive! Our service is available all year round, including spring, summer, fall and winter. No matter what the season, you can rely on us for complete care of your tree.

High Quality, Affordable Care For Your Tree

We are dedicated to providing the best quality care for your tree at an affordable price. Our full service includes:

Repetitive pruning to promote a well-shaped and structured tree that’s easy on the eyes.

Japanese Tree Lilac Problems – Treating Problems In Ivory Silk Lilac Trees on igrowplants.net

Removal of dead, diseased or damaged wood.

Inspection of your tree’s overall condition.

Application of necessary medication to infected areas.

Replenishment of moisture and nutrients in the soil.

Stabilization of root structure if needed.

Trimming and shaping of grass and weeds around the base of the tree.

Blowing of debris from the surface of leaves.

Applying beneficial insects to prevent damage from chewing and boring pests.

Applying larva, which will turn into birds to control populations of insects that eat tree seeds.

Apply natural, non-toxic substances to prevent fungal diseases in wet weather.

Don’t wait until your tree becomes sick or damaged. Let our expert gardeners care for your tree now and keep it healthy for years to come.

For Quality Care Of Your Tree,

Japanese Tree Lilac Problems – Treating Problems In Ivory Silk Lilac Trees on igrowplants.net

Call Japanese Tree Lilac Care Service!

(720) 866-8977

We also serve the entire Denver area including Littleton, Lakewood, Englewood, Wheat Ridge, Sheridan, Westminster and Arvada.

Sources & references used in this article:

Identification and characterization of a fungus that causes leaf spot on Japanese tree lilac in the Upper Midwest by AM Dombroski – 2005 – lib.dr.iastate.edu

Diseases and pests of ornamental plants by PP Pirone – 1978 – books.google.com

MULTIPLE DISEASE RESISTANCE TO POWDERY MILDEW, BACTERIAL BLIGHT, AND ALTERNARIA BLIGHT IN LILACS (SYRINGA SPP.). by MT Mmbaga, RJ Sauvé, E Nnodu, S Zhou – Journal of Arboriculture, 2005 – academia.edu

DR. TREE’S GUIDE TO THE COMMON DISEASES OF URBAN PRAIRIE TREES by M Allen – 2014 – books.google.com

Broadleaved Shrubs and Shade Trees: Problems, Picture Clues, and Management Options (NRAES 183) by MK Malinoski, DL Clement – 2009 – ecommons.cornell.edu

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