Growing Onion Seed: Planting Onion Seeds In The Garden

The most common question is “How do I plant onion seeds?”

Well, let’s start with the basics first. There are two types of onion seeds: Direct Sow and Indirect Sow. Both type of seeds have different characteristics. Let’s look at them separately.

First, what is direct sow?

Direct sow means that you plant the seed directly into soil without any other preparation. For example, if you want to plant a few dozen onion seeds in your garden, then all you need is some dry potting mix and water. You will see that these seeds will sprout up immediately after planting. These are called direct sown because they were planted directly into the ground without any additional preparation or treatment like fertilizers or pesticides.

Indirect sow means that you plant the seed into soil which is mixed with other ingredients such as compost, manure, or even animal waste. For example, if you want to plant a few dozen onion seeds in your garden, then all you need is some moist potting mix and water. You will see that these seeds will sprout up after several weeks.

These are called indirect sowed because they were planted into soil mixed with other ingredients such as compost or manure.

Onion seeds can be grown in containers or directly in the garden. When growing onions in containers, choose a larger container (at least 20 inches wide and 15 inches deep) for best results. For most of us, growing onions in containers is more practical because we can move them around or even bring them inside during wintertime.

When it comes to growing vegetables, onion is a fairly easy one. It doesn’t need a lot of attention like other vegetables might need. However, it still needs a little bit of care.

Make sure that you plant your onion seeds (whether direct or indirect sowed) in a sunny place if possible. These plants don’t like the shade!

Onion is a great vegetable to grow since it is used in almost every type of food. If you are like most of us, then there is no shortage of onion in your kitchen. It is also known as the “industrial strength” vegetable since it can withstand extreme conditions.

Sources & references used in this article:

Garden seeds in England before the late eighteenth century: I. Seed growing by M Thick – The Agricultural History Review, 1990 – JSTOR

Longevity of onion seed in relation to storage conditions by JH Beattie, VR Boswell – 1939 – books.google.com

Physical, chemical and bioactive properties of onion (Allium cepa L.) seed and seed oil by H Yalcin, H Kavuncuoglu – Journal of Applied Botany and Food …, 2014 – researchgate.net

Effect of cowdung at different level of phosphorus on growth, yield and quality seed production of onion by MK Ali, MN Alam, MS Islam, MK Islam… – Research Journal of …, 2008 – aensiweb.net

Comparative laboratory and field germination of onion seed by BE Clark – Proceedings of the Association of Official Seed …, 1942 – JSTOR

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