What Is A Mandevilla?

A mandevilla is a type of succulent plant that grows from the ground like a small tree or shrub. They are usually green but sometimes they have other colors such as red, orange, purple, pink or even white. Their flowers are tiny and pale blue in color. The petals turn yellow at maturity and fall off after flowering. These plants grow up to 6 feet tall and wide.

The name “mandava” comes from the Malagasy word “mabavanga”, which means “tree of life”.

How Can You Restore A Dying Mandevilla?

You may want to consider restoring your old mandevillas because they are not going to die out anytime soon. If you don’t have any, then it’s time to start looking for some. There are many varieties available and each one has its own unique characteristics.

Mandevilla Plants Are Easy To Grow And Care For!

They’re easy to grow and require little attention. They thrive in warm climates so you’ll need a sunny location where the soil temperature reaches 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21 C). Water them regularly when they are dry. You can keep them watered until their roots become covered with water droplets.

Then, drain the excess water and place the plant back into its pot. Fertilize them once a month with a water-soluble fertilizer.

Trim off any dead or diseased canes and pinch back the tips of new growth to encourage branching and bushiness.

These plants prefer a well-draining soil mix so they’re not prone to root rot. If your mix retains a lot of water, then you should add some coarse material like pebbles or perlite to the potting soil.

You can trim off the flower after it has bloomed to promote more blooms and bushy growth.

How To Identify And Treat The Most Common Problems

Treating Yellow Leaves On Mandevilla: What To Do For A Mandevilla Plant Turning Yellow from our website

These plants are susceptible to a few insects and diseases. Most of them can be easily identified by the symptoms they cause. If you think you have an infestation or disease problem, then you should contact your local garden center or nursery for professional diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Most problems occur because the plant isn’t getting the care that it needs.

Sources & references used in this article:

Characterization of a Cucumber mosaic virus isolate infecting Mandevilla sanderi (Hemsl.) Woodson by S Davino, MG Bellardi, M Di Bella, M Davino… – Phytopathologia …, 2005 – JSTOR

A synopsis of the genus Mandevilla (Apocynaceae) in Mexico and Central America by JF Morales – Brittonia, 1998 – JSTOR

IS MANDEVILLA (APOCYNACEAE, MESECHITEAE) MONOPHYLETIC? EVIDENCE FROM FIVE PLASTID DNA LOCI AND MORPHOLOGY1 by AO Simões, ME Endress, T van der Niet… – Annals of the Missouri …, 2006 – BioOne

Biological and molecular characterization of isolates of catharanthus mosaic virus infecting Mandevilla sp. by GM Favara, VM Camelo-García, JMF Silva… – Tropical Plant …, 2020 – Springer

Volatile compounds of Mandevilla guanabarica (Apocynoideae, Apocynaceae) from three restingas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil by SZ Cordeiro, A Sato, RC de Oliveira Arruda… – Biochemical Systematics …, 2012 – Elsevier

The Mexican genera of the Apocynaceae (sensu A. DC.), with key and additional taxonomic notes by JK WILLIAMS – SIDA, Contributions to Botany, 1996 – JSTOR

Influence of substrate pH on the growth and flowering of Mandevilla Lindl. Sundaville®’Pretty Red’ by A Kapczyńska, K Magdziarz – Folia Horticulturae, 2015 – content.sciendo.com

In vitro conservation of Mandevilla moricandiana (Apocynaceae): short-term storage and encapsulation–dehydration of nodal segments by SZ Cordeiro, NK Simas, AB Henriques… – … Biology-Plant, 2014 – Springer

APOCYNACEAE (SENSU A. DC), WITH KEY by JK WILLIAMS – researchgate.net

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