Creeping Sedums are one of the most popular ground covers in gardens. They make excellent additions to any garden landscape because they provide good drainage, do not require much water or fertilizer, and have attractive foliage. However, there are some things that need to be considered before using them as your main groundcover.

Climbing plants like climbing vines and climbing herbs may become invasive if overgrown and neglected.

The leaves of creeping sedums are very delicate and will easily fall off if handled carelessly. Careless handling could result in damage to the plant or even death.

Some species of creeping sedums produce seeds which can cause problems if planted near other plants. If these seeds germinate, they will grow into their own plant and compete with other plants for light and nutrients.

There are several different types of creeping sedums. Some are hardy perennials while others are annuals that need to be pruned regularly.

You should choose the type of creeping sedum that best suits your needs.

Yellow Flowers: Yellow flowers are usually produced from spring through summer and then again in fall. These flowers contain small white petals which can range in size from 1/8 inch to 3/4 inch long.

Some creeping sedums have flowers that last from spring to fall and may even bloom in the winter. The flowers of these creeping sedums are usually yellow but may also be pink, white, red or purple. Yellow flowers attract bees, which is great for people who like to watch wildlife. Creeping Sedums can be used as ground covers on hillsides or in rock gardens.

It is important to research Creeping Sedum before planting them in your garden. Most species are hardy but some may not survive in certain conditions.

You should know how much light, water, and fertilizer your creeping sedums need. It is also important to note that most creeping sedums bloom in the spring or summer. Creeping sedums can be used as ground covers on hillsides or in rock gardens.

Pinching: Pinching is a technique used to promote branching on a plant. Every gardener does some form of pinching or pruning.

Creeping Succulent Plants – Do Succulents Make Good Groundcover from our website

This can be done at any time of the year but it is usually done to remove dead flowers, control the size of a particular area or to promote branching. Pinching is a natural way to keep your Creeping Sedums in shape so you don’t need to weed around them or mow around them as much.

Cultivars: Like most plants, there are a lot of different types of Creeping Sedums. Some of the more common ones are listed below.

‘Aureum’: This is one of the smallest types of creeping sedums with yellow flowers that bloom in summer. It grows to be only 6 inches tall and spreads up to 1 foot across.

It does not like hot weather and will die back in the summer if it gets too hot. It is hardy in zones 3-9 and shouldn’t need supplemental water unless it is extremely dry. It can be grown in full sun to partial shade. It can be grown in rock gardens, on banks, in troughs, along edges of paths, among stones or just about anywhere else you can think of.

‘Aureomarginatum’: This creeping sedum has yellow flowers that bloom from spring to summer. It grows to be 8 inches tall and spreads up to 3 feet across.

It grows best in full sun and should not need much, if any, supplemental water. It is hardy in zones 3-9.

‘Brilliant’: This creeping sedum has yellow flowers that bloom in summer. It grows to be 6 inches tall and spreads up to 2 feet across.

It grows best in full sun to partial shade and doesn’t like hot weather.

Sources & references used in this article:

Field guide to succulents of southern Africa by G Smith – 2017 – books.google.com

SUCCULENTS for most gardens Part 1 by RAY STEPHENSON – Cactus and Succulent Journal, 2005 – BioOne

Succulent Paradise–Twelve great gardens of the world by G Smith – 2013 – books.google.com

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