Spirea Plant Varieties: What Are They?

There are different kinds of spirea plants. There are dwarf spirea varieties which grow only up to 1 foot tall. These varieties bloom only once in two years or less. Other kinds of spirea include those with flowers that blossom every day, those with flowers that bloom twice a year, and others that have both kinds of blooming season. Some spirea varieties produce no fruit at all!

Dwarf spirea varieties are usually found in the northern parts of Japan. They are often called “dwarfed” because they don’t reach their full height, but rather just reach half way up the tree. Most of them flower once a year or even less than once a year depending on climate conditions. Some dwarf varieties produce fruits like other kinds of spirea plants do, while some produce no fruit at all!

The most common kind of spirea variety is the Japanese dwarf spirea (Spiraea japonica). This type produces small fruits that resemble tiny grapes. The fruit ripens in late spring or early summer and then drops off after it’s eaten. The leaves are very short and the branches are slender. They’re not too bushy, so they tend to grow along the ground instead of growing high up in trees.

There are many different kinds of spirea, and all of them are listed below.

Regular Spirea Varieties

The regular spirea varieties bloom once or twice a year and grow anywhere from one foot to 6 feet tall. They grow in open fields and forest edges. These types of spirea plants can survive in wet or dry soil. They bloom in the spring or summer and produce small fruits that resemble blueberries.

pink umbrella spirea

pale spirea

red spirea

travellers joy

white whisk fern

Whorled spirea varieties grow in clumps, and they have three or more leaves that spiral around a short woody stalk. These types of spirea plants bloom once or twice a year and grow up to 5 feet tall. The flowers bloom in the spring, and they grow in open fields and forest edges. They grow in wet or dry soil. The fruit that these spirea plants produce is small and resembles a blueberry.

pink whorled spirea

Spirea Plant Varieties: Learn About Different Kinds Of Spirea Bushes | igrowplants.net

purple whorled spirea

red whorled spirea

white whorled spirea

Yellow spirea varieties grow in open fields or forest edges and sometimes even on cliff faces. They can be found in wet or dry soil and they grow anywhere from one foot to 6 feet tall. They bloom in late spring or summer and produce small fruits that resemble blueberries.

canby’s spirea

firefly spirea

golden spirea

lavender spirea

pale spirea

Spirea Plant Varieties: Learn About Different Kinds Of Spirea Bushes | igrowplants.net

yellow spirea

There are many kinds of spirea, and all of them are listed above. Feel free to click on any of the names of the varieties to learn more about them!

Remember, spirea is a poisonous plant that may cause vomiting and a rash if you come into contact with the leaves or berries. Never eat or touch any part of this plant! If you need to remove it from your yard or garden, make sure to wear heavy gloves and goggles when handling it, and always make sure that the soil is thoroughly washed before you plant anything in that spot again.

Check back next week to learn about another variety of flower!

NOTE: If you don’t get this reference, you’re probably too young to understand it. You need to read Douglas Adams’ “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” series. It’s a very funny read. Trust me. I’ll wait.

Done?

Good. Now, if you’re interested in reading some more of my garden-themed writings, check out the links below!

Gardening Blogs

Gardening Books

Sources & references used in this article:

Genetic variation and clonal structure of the rare, riparian shrub Spiraea virginiana (Rosaceae) by JR Brzyski, TM Culley – Conservation Genetics, 2011 – Springer

Construction cost and invasive potential: comparing Lythrum salicaria (Lythraceae) with co‐occurring native species along pond banks by JM Nagel, KL Griffin – American Journal of Botany, 2001 – Wiley Online Library

Estimation of relative water use among ornamental landscape species by MC Garcıa-Navarro, RY Evans, RS Montserrat – Scientia Horticulturae, 2004 – Elsevier

Overwintering of the spirea aphid, Aphis citricola van der Goot (Homoptera: Aphididae) on citrus and spirea plants by S KOMAZAKI – Applied Entomology and Zoology, 1983 – jstage.jst.go.jp

Categories:

Tags:

Comments are closed