Tree Philodendron Houseplants: How To Grow A Tree Philodendron Plant

Tree Philodendron Houseplants: How To Grow A Tree Philodendron Plant

The most common name for this plant is “tree” or “palm tree”. However, it’s not really a palm at all.

It’s actually a member of the family Fabaceae (Ficus). There are several species of this genus, but only one is native to North America.

In fact, there are two species of Ficus that grow well indoors. They’re called “Philodendron” and “Bipinnatifidum”.

Both have similar shapes with leaves that vary from light green to dark green. But they’re different enough to warrant their own names!

These houseplants require very little attention other than regular watering and air circulation. If you live in a climate where these plants don’t thrive, then you might want to consider another species.

There are many varieties of Bipinnatifidum available online. You’ll need to do some research before picking out your favorite.

The best way is to ask someone who grows them if they’ve got any recommendations. Or, just go ahead and buy one of the ones that look like they’d work best for your needs!

Tree Philodendron Houseplants: How To Grow A Tree Philodendron Plant at igrowplants.net

If you plan on keeping your ficus in a small area, then you’ll need to repot it fairly often. But if you’re going to keep it out somewhere like a porch or patio, then it can stay in the same pot for several years.

Eventually, these plants can grow quite large. But don’t worry: they don’t grow as big as they appear in photos and online!

While it’s very common to find trees that are 6 feet in height or more, you’ll probably end up with one that is about half that size.

These plants tend to grow straight up instead of outwards. And despite popular belief, they don’t actually grow into trees overnight.

These plants grow slowly and can take several years before they need to be re-potted. During this time, you should keep the soil fairly moist but not soggy.

If you live in a dry climate, then you’ll need to water your plant more often. The best way to tell if your tree philodendron needs more water is to stick your finger about an inch into the soil.

If it feels dry then it’s time to water it.

If you want to get technical, you can measure the moisture of the soil with a soil moisture meter. These devices are fairly inexpensive and they’re quite easy to use.

Just stick the metal end into the soil and it’ll tell you whether or not it needs water.

One thing to remember is that Ficus trees don’t like their feet wet. In other words, don’t over water your tree!

Tree Philodendron Houseplants: How To Grow A Tree Philodendron Plant | igrowplants.net

The best way to water it is with a spray bottle. Just give it a quick spritz every couple of days.

These plants grow best in medium light conditions but can adapt to lower lighting conditions.

Sources & references used in this article:

How plants shape the ant community in the Amazonian rainforest canopy: the key role of extrafloral nectaries and homopteran honeydew by N Blüthgen, M Verhaagh, W Goitía, K Jaffé… – Oecologia, 2000 – Springer

Cultural Guidelines for Commercial Production of Interiorscape Philodendron by DB McConnell, J Chen, RJ Henny, KC Everitt – EDIS, 2003 – journals.flvc.org

Effects of explant type and growth regulators on organogenesis ina medicinal tree, Philodendron amurense Rupr. by MAK Azad, S Yokota, S Yahara – Asian Journal of Plant Sciences …, 2004 – agris.fao.org

Micropropagation of Lacy Tree Philodendron (Philodendron bipinnatifidum Schott ex Endl.) by AA Alawaadh, YH Dewir, MS Alwihibi, AA Aldubai… – …, 2020 – journals.ashs.org

Nutrition of lacy tree philodendron (Philodendron bipinnatifidum Schott et Endl.). Part I. The effect on plant growth by A Komosa, T Kleiber, P Wojtysiak – Acta Scientiarum Polonorum …, 2011 – researchgate.net

Indoor air quality in Florida houseplants to fight pollution by V Peart – Department of family, youth and community services …, 1992 – w.whyrealty.com

Correlation of visual quality grading and SPAD reading of green-leaved foliage plants by Q Wang, J Chen, RH Stamps, Y Li – Journal of plant nutrition, 2005 – Taylor & Francis

Nutrition of lacy tree philodendron (Philodendron bipinnatifidum Schott et Endl.). Part II. Nutrient contents in leaves by A Komosa, T Kleiber, P Wojtysiak – Acta Sci. Pol. Hortorum …, 2011 – researchgate.net

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